BOOK: Woodard on Human Consumption and Homoeroticism in U.S. Slave Culture

Vincent Woodard, The Delectable Negro: Human Consumption and Homoeroticism within US Slave Culture. NYU Press, 2014.

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Dunbar on Episode 3 of Roots: “I Decided to Live” @ProcessHistory“

Erica Armstrong Dunbar writes:

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ARTICLE: Hartman on Black Women’s Labors

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“Negro Quarters” in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine (1853), vol. 9, p. 753. (Copy in Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library) as shown on http://www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.
Saidiya Hartman, “The Belly of the World: A Note on Black Women’s Labors.” Souls 18, no. 1 (2016): 166-173.
First paragraph:

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Johnson on Black Diasporic Intellectual Production for @AAIHS

Johnson writes:

“What do historians of the earlier period do when dealing with black diasporic subjects laboring and living in a world of ideas, philosophies, and cosmologies but largely without alphanumeric texts? Does this black intellectual production only start becoming intellectual history when texts written by people of African descent begin to appear? What new possibilities for intellectual work open when the enslaved and the period of slavery become central?

Instead of approaches, below are five written texts I often return to when thinking with (not necessarily through) and engaging the intellectual production of people of African descent circling the Atlantic before emancipation….”

Read the entire post: Thinking with Black Diasporic Intellectual Production | African American Intellectual History Society

EDITED: M’Bow on Gender Equality, Women, and Citizenship in Africa

Penda M’Bow, ed. Hommes et femmes entre sphères publique et privée. Dakar: Codesria, 2005.

The result of a 1998 conference on gender equality in Africa, Hommes et femmes explores the position of men and women in the public and private spheres across the continent, with a special focus on the role gender inequity and sexism played in democratization and globalization.

M’Bow writes:

“La définition même des pouvoirs féminins dans un contexte de sujétion et d’infériorité constituait l’enjeu central du thème. Fallait-il comprendre ces pouvoirs comme une autorité pleine et entière détenue par les femmes dans une sphère spécifique, une autorité d’ailleurs souvent exercée aux dépens d’autres femmes comme une participation limitée et minoritaire aux pouvoirs des hommes? comme des contre-pouvoirs ou alors séducteurs, secrets et illicites? ou encore comme une ré-appropriation et un détournement (qui est retournement contre le domi- nateur) des instruments symboliques qui instituent la domination masculine? La construction d’une périodisation propre de l’évolution du statut des femmes devait être envisagée pour mieux étudier les différentes modalités du pouvoir des femmes. C’est en démêlant les relations qu’elles entretiennent aussi bien avec les hommes que les unes avec les autres que l’on pouvait comprendre comment un pouvoir féminin [se construit à l’intérieur d’un système de rapports inégalitaires.”

Edited by scholar and activist Penda M’Bow, the volume is available by chapter online. [Click Here]

EDITED: Robertson and Klein on Women and Slavery in Africa

RobertsonKleinWomenSlavery

African Diaspora, Ph.D. is revisiting scholarship that has shaped the study of people of African descent across time and place.

Claire C. Robertson and Martin A. Klein, eds. Women and Slavery in Africa. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1985.

In a 1985 review of the volume, Patrick Manning wrote:

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ESSAY: Stevenson on the History of Slavery and Slavery Today

Summer of 2013, in the wake of three kidnappings, each involving young women of color, Brenda Stevenson offered these comments on ways histories of Atlantic slavery continue to reverberate in violence against women today:

The brutal physical, psychological and sexual abuse that Ariel Castro inflicted on Michelle Knight, Amanda Berry, and Georgina DeJesus was typical of what black enslaved women endured over the generations. Michelle Knight’s description of her life of horrors and how she was able to survive it — through bonding with another slave woman — suggests the strength and importance of communal bonds as survival and resistance strategies of slaves in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Likewise, these women’s belief that they would not remain in slavery, as well as the Kenyan maid’s mad dash for freedom on an Orange County bus, suitcase in tow, underscore the resilience and resistance of past bondsmen and women. They are our contemporary Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs and Lavinia Bell. Amanda Berry’s determination to shield her daughter from the violence and shame of her conception, and the brutal deaths of her siblings and stepsiblings at the hands of her “father/master,” speaks to the code of silence that many women, and men, evoked in order to shield the devastating experiences of their lives from public view and to protect their children. The “impact statements” that the families of Knight, Berry and DeJesus voiced, echo the sense of loss and devastation that colonial and antebellum slave families experienced when subject to separation and sale; as well as the immense joy they felt when they received word of their kin’s survival or actual return.

Modern-day slaveholders also offer insight that tugs at debates regarding the past institution. Ariel Castro’s courtroom lament that he was not a “monster,” but rather a “good worker” and “father” who took his daughter to church on Sundays, sheds a harsh light on lingering myths of Southern patriarchy and paternalism. His justification of his abuse — that he was only physically violent when provoked and that his sexual acts with his captives were consensual, even requested — echoes apologists theories that the antebellum institution was a “positive good” and that concubinage implied “loving” relationships. The notion that the Kenyan and Filipina workers of Aayban flew first class and attended spas as an example of how well they were treated is reminiscent of the tauted material condition of some past slaves who paid dearly as a result — the domestics, for example, who had better clothing and food than average field slaves, but who spent much of their lives separated from their kin and friends and were much more likely to be physically brutalized by mistresses with whom they worked or sexually assaulted by masters who had close physical proximity.

Read the entire essay: What the History of Slavery Can Teach Us About Slavery Today by Brenda Stevenson (2013) | History News Network

Brenda E. Stevenson, professor of history at UCLA, is the author of Life in Black and White: Family and Community in the Slave South (Oxford University Press, 1996). The full essay was published at the History News Network on August 19, 2013.

(Reblogged from Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog)