On the Imperative of Transnational Solidarity: A U.S. Black Feminist Statement on the Assassination of Marielle Franco – The Black Scholar

Kia L. Caldwell, Wendi Muse, Tianna S. Paschel, Keisha-Khan Y. Perry, Christen A. Smith, and Erica L. Williams publish collective statement on the assassination of Marielle Franco:

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DIGITAL: Lander’s ESSSS Project Featured in NEH Humanities

The Ecclesiastical and Secular Sources for Slave Societies (ESSSS) project, led by Jane Landers, featured in NEH Humanities:

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Support Palabras for PR #PuertoRico

Jessica Marie Johnson writes:

I am helping to host an online fundraiser via YouCaring for Festival de la Palabra, located in Loíza, Puerto Rico. Please help us reach our $5,000 goal: http://youcaring.com/PalabrasPR

 

The mission of Festival de la Palabra is to internationalize Puerto Rican literature through the promotion of reading and creative writing in Puerto Rico and the creation of meeting spaces between writers and readers at school, national and international levels. Since Hurricane Maria, organizers and volunteers from Festival de la Palabra (FDLP) have been engaged in relief activities supporting some of the most isolated communities and youth through the arts. FDLP’s projects are based in Loíza, Puerto Rico, a historically Afrxdescendiente area of the island.

In case you missed that part — These funds are going to support Black Diasporic Puerto Ricans. Yes, of course, this is the part of the island that is receiving the least amount of attention, the least amount of aid, and has the greatest need.

Festival de la Palabra Founder, Mayra Santos-Febres

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ARTICLE: Barragan on Female Slaveholders in Colombia

Yesenia Barragan, “Gendering Mastery: Female Slaveholders in the Colombian Pacific Lowlands.” Slavery & Abolition (July 24, 2017): 1–26.

Abstract:

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NEWS: International Slavery Museum marks ten years with stories of Ink and Blood 

New exhibit on slavery in Argentina, Cuba, Jamaica, the United States and Bahrain opens:

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BOOK: Schmidt-Nowara on Slavery and Freedom in Latin America

Christopher Schmidt-Nowara, Slavery, Freedom, and Abolition in Latin America and the Atlantic World. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2011.

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BOOK: Borucki on Shipmates, Soldiers and Black Identity in the Río de la Plata

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Alex Borucki, From Shipmates to Soldiers: Emerging Black Identities in the Río de La Plata. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2015.

via University of New Mexico Press:

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BOOK: Nwankwo on Black Cosmopolitanism in the 19th Century

Nwankwo_Black_Cosmo_Cover
Nwankwo, Ifeoma Kiddoe. Black Cosmopolitanism: Racial Consciousness and Transnational Identity in the Nineteenth-Century Americas. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005.

via UPenn Press:

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EDITED: Bryant, O’Toole, and Vinson on Africans to Spanish America

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Sherwin K. Bryant, Rachel Sarah O’Toole, and Ben Vinson, eds. Africans to Spanish America: Expanding the Diaspora. University of Illinois Press, 2014.

via University of Illinois Press:

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Childs on Doing African Diaspora History as a Latin Americanist

In “Between Latin America and the African Diaspora?” Greg Childs discusses researching Latin America’s black history and the conflicts that can arise:

Perhaps because I was indeed sitting right beside him the man did not see me. Or maybe he saw me but genuinely had no clue what kind of work I did or what to make of it or how to understand the way he had heard my work described. After all, I had in fact been introduced to the committee at the previous meeting as the new guy and as a specialist in African Diaspora and Brazilian history. Whatever the reason was that he did not see me, so to speak, it was merely a re-incarnation of a scene that had become quite familiar, that had happened many times before in prior years and that was essentially informed by a singular confusion: was I a scholar of black studies or a scholar of Latin America? Or perhaps even more generally, was I a historian of a subset of people who could be located anywhere or a historian of a “legitimate” region (and indeed a few days later the same individual approached me and apologized by saying “I’m sorry. I just thought you studied black people out there, you know, in lots of places”)?

For all the academic and mainstream recognition of black folk in Latin America over the past few years, such encounters are disheartening reminders that inclusion does not signal transformation. But lamenting how blackness is included but not viewed as central or characteristic of Latin American history is less interesting than asking why this continues to occur, and for me the answer seems to cohere around two issues: the power that “institutional history” has had in shaping questions about subjugated peoples in Latin America, and relatedly the enduring influence that theories concerned with structures and institutions of history have had in Latin American scholarship….

Read the rest Between Latin America and the African Diaspora? at AAIHS