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ARTICLE: Hartman on Black Women’s Labors

HW9-760
“Negro Quarters” in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine (1853), vol. 9, p. 753. (Copy in Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library) as shown on http://www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.
Saidiya Hartman, “The Belly of the World: A Note on Black Women’s Labors.” Souls 18, no. 1 (2016): 166-173.
First paragraph:

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Colored Conventions Project

DIGITAL: Rudisell of the Colored Conventions Project on Copyright and Doing Digital Black History

Carol A. Rudisell, librarian at the University of Delaware Library, writes about working with the Colored Conventions Project (previously featured at #ADPhD & Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog):

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Rael on Ferguson, Respectability Politics, and the Early Republic

Six months after the murder of Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, it is worth revisiting scholars’ reflections on what his death, extrajudicial killings of people of African descent, and histories of slavery and diaspora have in common. Last August, Patrick Rael placed present-day re-articulations of respectability politics against a long history of black political rhetoric, beginning with antebellum free black activists’ debates about moral uplift … Continue reading Rael on Ferguson, Respectability Politics, and the Early Republic

HullButSomeofUsAreBraveFTD

EDITED: Hull, Scott & Smith’s Some of Us Are Brave (1982)

African Diaspora, Ph.D. is revisiting scholarship that has shaped the study of people of African descent across time and place.  In 1982, Hull, Scott, and Smith published a compilation of scholarship on the history, condition, and politics of black women in the United States. The works collected in Some of Us Are Brave spoke back to academic and policy research done in the name of … Continue reading EDITED: Hull, Scott & Smith’s Some of Us Are Brave (1982)

The Public Archive on Radical Black Cities

Weekend Reading: The Public Archive on “Radical Black Cities”

This week, The Public Archive published its fourth installment on Radical Black Reading.  The subject was race, urbanity, black geographies, and sense of place: In this, The Public Archive’s fourth installment of Radical Black Reading,* we hope to contribute to an informal conversation about the history, plight, and future of Black cities – and towards the imagination of a radical Black city. It is a conversation … Continue reading Weekend Reading: The Public Archive on “Radical Black Cities”

Blight: What gives the Confederacy its staying power?

In April, when Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell issued a proclamation reviving Confederate History Month in the commonwealth, he reminded us once again of the Confederacy’s staying power. Wittingly or not, McDonnell demonstrated that historical “memory disputes” are always about the present, as he spoke in the tradition of a long line of Southern leaders beginning with the founders of the Confederacy itself. Immediately, Civil War … Continue reading Blight: What gives the Confederacy its staying power?

Ted Fellow Cesar Harada Blogs 1811 Louisiana Slave Revolt, Gulf Coast Oil Spill, Environment

In 1811 white landlords were forcing black slaves to manipulate fatal toxic, such as the one required in the fabrication of Indigo (pigment). Today, the swamps owned by the former slaves children has been bought by major energy companies at an unfair price to host multi-millions polluting facilities. The descents of the slaves still live on the “fence lines” of these industries. The inhabitants suffer severe … Continue reading Ted Fellow Cesar Harada Blogs 1811 Louisiana Slave Revolt, Gulf Coast Oil Spill, Environment

Dorothy Height, Civil Rights Hero, Has Died (NPR)

“We need to look at who has the opportunities. We need to look at — Obama himself pointed that to us, that you can’t have a flourishing Wall Street and a destroyed Main Street. He could have also said, I’m working for the middle class, but we still have poverty. And we cannot divide up like that. We cannot say who’s hurting the most. We … Continue reading Dorothy Height, Civil Rights Hero, Has Died (NPR)