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Petrella on Slavery, Democracy, and the Racialized Roots of the Electoral College | @AAIHS

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 14, 2016, in light of the recent election, the Christopher F. Petrella published this essay on the African American Intellectual History Society blog:

Petrella writes:

“In a direct election system, the North would have outnumbered the South (which had a large population but far fewer eligible voters), whose roughly 550,000 enslaved black people were disenfranchised. Delegates from the South generally supported Madison’s idea of the Electoral College over a direct election system because it was based solely on population volume, not citizenship status or enfranchisement. In conjunction, and at Madison’s urging, the convention agreed to count each enslaved black person as three-fifths of a citizen for the purpose of calculating each state’s representation in the Electoral College and in the allotment of congressional seats.”

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Toussaint Louverture [Image fixe] : chef des noirs insurgés de Saint Domingue (entre 1796 et 1799) / Collection de Vinck. Un siècle d'histoire de France par l'estampe, 1770-1870. Vol. 44

ARTICLE: Semley on “To Live and Die, Free and French”

 
Toussaint Louverture [Image fixe] : chef des noirs insurgés de Saint Domingue (entre 1796 et 1799) / Collection de Vinck. Un siècle d'histoire de France par l'estampe, 1770-1870. Vol. 44
Toussaint Louverture: chef des noirs insurgés de Saint Domingue (entre 1796 et 1799) / Collection de Vinck. Un siècle d’histoire de France par l’estampe, 1770-1870. Vol. 44 / BNF
Lorelle D. Semley, “To Live and Die, Free and French Toussaint Louverture’s 1801 Constitution and the Original Challenge of Black Citizenship.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (2013): 65–90.

Abstract:

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Image Reference
LCP-01Z

Source
Jesse Torrey, A Portraiture of Domestic Slavery in the United States (Philadelphia, 1817), between pp. 36 and 37. (Copy in Library Company of Philadelphia)

Comments
Titled "View of the Capitol of the United States after the Conflagration, in 1814," the lower right hand corner of this woodcut shows a group of nine adult slaves and two children; some of the adults are manacled or chained. None of the illustrations in this abolitionist tract are based on eye-witness drawings, but are artist's conceptions, intended to evoke the topics discussed in the text. This illustration appears in different places, depending on the copy. In the Boston Athaneum copy, for example, it faces the frontspiece or title page; the copy in the University of Virginia library lacks illustrations.
 Chained Slaves in Front of the U.S. Capital Building, Washington, D.C., 1814

VIDEO: Bell on Enslaved Labor Used to Build the Capitol | C-SPAN

LCP-01Z_Slaves_Chained_in_front_of_Capitol.jpg
Chained Slaves in Front of the U.S. Capital Building, Washington, D.C., 1814, Jesse Torrey, A Portraiture of Domestic Slavery in the United States (Philadelphia, 1817), between pp. 36 and 37. (Copy in Library Company of Philadelphia) as shown on http://www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.

via #slaveryarchive:
Continue reading “VIDEO: Bell on Enslaved Labor Used to Build the Capitol | C-SPAN”

hw9-7601

ARTICLE: Hartman on Black Women’s Labors

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“Negro Quarters” in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine (1853), vol. 9, p. 753. (Copy in Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library) as shown on http://www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.
Saidiya Hartman, “The Belly of the World: A Note on Black Women’s Labors.” Souls 18, no. 1 (2016): 166-173.
First paragraph:

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Colored Conventions Project

DIGITAL: Rudisell of the Colored Conventions Project on Copyright and Doing Digital Black History

Carol A. Rudisell, librarian at the University of Delaware Library, writes about working with the Colored Conventions Project (previously featured at #ADPhD & Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog):

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Rael on Ferguson, Respectability Politics, and the Early Republic

Six months after the murder of Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, it is worth revisiting scholars’ reflections on what his death, extrajudicial killings of people of African descent, and histories of slavery and diaspora have in common. Last August, Patrick Rael placed present-day re-articulations of respectability politics against a long history of black political rhetoric, beginning with antebellum free black activists’ debates about moral uplift … Continue reading Rael on Ferguson, Respectability Politics, and the Early Republic