ARTICLE: Everill on “All the baubles that they needed”: “Industriousness” and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée

Bronwen Everill, “‘All the Baubles That They Needed’: ‘Industriousness’ and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée,” Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 15, no. 4 (November 1, 2017): 714–39.

 

Abstract:

“Atlantic port cities were sites of commercial, consumer, and industrious revolutions in the eighteenth century. This essay argues that accounts of the Atlantic consumer and industrious revolutions need to include African port cities because they were an important market for consumer goods and services. The Senegambian cities of Saint-Louis and Gorée were port cities involved in the consumption of Atlantic and global goods, as well as in the provision of services for ships involved in trade, and especially the slave trade. They had a class of women involved in the economic transformation of the cities, who help illustrate the role of consumerism, as well as the possibilities for accumulation created by the institution of domestic urban slavery. It is useful to look at African port cities because their experiences of urban slavery can help us think critically about what is meant by the industrious household and about how women in different Atlantic contexts were able to accumulate and use invested capital in varying ways.”

Read: Project MUSE – “All the baubles that they needed”: “Industriousness” and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée

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ARTICLE: Saillant on Funeral Ceremonies in the Sea Islands

John Saillant, “‘All Is for the Wind:” Notes on Funeral and Baptism Ceremonies on a Georgia Sea Island, c. 1868–1887,” Journal of Southern Religion (19) (2017): jsreligion.org/vol19/saillant

Saillant writes:

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ARTICLE: King on Enslaved Women, Murder, and Southern Courts

Wilma King, “Mad” Enough to Kill: Enslaved Women, Murder, and Southern Courts, The Journal of African American History, Vol. 92, No. 1, Women, Slavery, and Historical Research (Winter, 2007), pp. 37-56

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ARTICLES: Connolly and Fuentes Co-Edit Special Issue on Archives of Slavery

Scholars of slavery engage history, archives, Saidiya Hartman, and violence, in a recent History of the Present. From the introduction by Brian Connolly and Marisa Fuentes:

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ARTICLE: Barragan on Female Slaveholders in Colombia

Yesenia Barragan, “Gendering Mastery: Female Slaveholders in the Colombian Pacific Lowlands.” Slavery & Abolition (July 24, 2017): 1–26.

Abstract:

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ARTICLE: Webster on Northern Black Womanhood in the Nineteenth Century

Crystal Lynn Webster, “In Pursuit of Autonomous Womanhood: Nineteenth-Century Black Motherhood in the U.S. North.” Slavery & Abolition 38, no. 2 (April 3, 2017): 425–40.

Abstract:
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ARTICLE: Holden on African-American Children and the Southampton Rebellion of 1831

Vanessa M. Holden. “Generation, resistance, and survival: African-American children and the Southampton Rebellion of 1831.” Slavery & Abolition pp. 1-47 (2017)

Abstract:

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ARTICLE: Webb on Slave Narratives and the Sentencing Court

Webb, Lindsey. “Slave Narratives and the Sentencing Court.” SSRN Scholarly Paper. Rochester, NY: Social Science Research Network, September 28, 2016.

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ARTICLES: JAAH SYMPOSIUM ON GERALD HORNE

A special symposium in the Journal of African American History featured the work of Gerald Horne, historian of African American and African diaspora history:

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ARTICLE: Green on Letters from a Fancy Girl

Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Gift of Mrs. W. Fitch Ingersoll [58.4] Slave Market, ca. 1850-1860. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 39 1/2 inches. as seen at Schomburg In Motion http://www.inmotionaame.org/gallery/detail.cfm;jsessionid=f8301904881471088718788?migration=3&topic=99&id=341998&type=image&metadata=show&page=2&bhcp=1
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Gift of Mrs. W. Fitch Ingersoll [58.4]
Slave Market, ca. 1850-1860. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 39 1/2 inches. as seen at Schomburg Research Center Online Exhibit In Motion: The African American Migration Experience (click for more)
Sharony Green,“‘Mr Ballard, I Am Compelled to Write Again’: Beyond Bedrooms and Brothels, a Fancy Girl Speaks.” Black Women, Gender & Families 5, no. 1 (2011).

Green writes:

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