BLOGROLL/ARTICLES: Sinha’s Editor’s Note for June 2018 Journal of the Civil War Era on Abolitionism

Manisha Sinha writes:

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ARTICLE: Morgan on Partus Sequitur Ventrem: Law, Race, and Reproduction in Colonial Slavery

Jennifer L. Morgan; Partus sequitur ventrem: Law, Race, and Reproduction in Colonial Slavery. Small Axe 1 March 2018; 22 (1 (55)): 1–17. doi: https://doi.org/10.1215/07990537-4378888

Abstract:

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ARTICLE: Bell on Self-Emancipating Women, Civil War, and the Union Army in Louisiana and Georgia

Karen Cook Bell, “Self-Emancipating Women, Civil War, and the Union Army in Southern Louisiana and Lowcountry Georgia, 1861–1865,” The Journal of African American History 101, no. 1–2 (January 1, 2016): 1–22.
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ARTICLE: Forret on Slavery, Disability and the Census

Jeff Forret, “‘Deaf & Dumb, Blind, Insane, or Idiotic’: The Census, Slaves, and Disability in the Late Antebellum South,” Journal of Southern History 82, no. 3 (July 29, 2016): 503–48.
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ARTICLE: Everill on “All the baubles that they needed”: “Industriousness” and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée

Bronwen Everill, “‘All the Baubles That They Needed’: ‘Industriousness’ and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée,” Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 15, no. 4 (November 1, 2017): 714–39.

 

Abstract:

“Atlantic port cities were sites of commercial, consumer, and industrious revolutions in the eighteenth century. This essay argues that accounts of the Atlantic consumer and industrious revolutions need to include African port cities because they were an important market for consumer goods and services. The Senegambian cities of Saint-Louis and Gorée were port cities involved in the consumption of Atlantic and global goods, as well as in the provision of services for ships involved in trade, and especially the slave trade. They had a class of women involved in the economic transformation of the cities, who help illustrate the role of consumerism, as well as the possibilities for accumulation created by the institution of domestic urban slavery. It is useful to look at African port cities because their experiences of urban slavery can help us think critically about what is meant by the industrious household and about how women in different Atlantic contexts were able to accumulate and use invested capital in varying ways.”

Read: Project MUSE – “All the baubles that they needed”: “Industriousness” and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée

ARTICLE: Saillant on Funeral Ceremonies in the Sea Islands

John Saillant, “‘All Is for the Wind:” Notes on Funeral and Baptism Ceremonies on a Georgia Sea Island, c. 1868–1887,” Journal of Southern Religion (19) (2017): jsreligion.org/vol19/saillant

Saillant writes:

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ARTICLE: King on Enslaved Women, Murder, and Southern Courts

Wilma King, “Mad” Enough to Kill: Enslaved Women, Murder, and Southern Courts, The Journal of African American History, Vol. 92, No. 1, Women, Slavery, and Historical Research (Winter, 2007), pp. 37-56

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ARTICLES: Connolly and Fuentes Co-Edit Special Issue on Archives of Slavery

Scholars of slavery engage history, archives, Saidiya Hartman, and violence, in a recent History of the Present. From the introduction by Brian Connolly and Marisa Fuentes:

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