ARTICLE: Webb on Slave Narratives and the Sentencing Court

Webb, Lindsey. “Slave Narratives and the Sentencing Court.” SSRN Scholarly Paper. Rochester, NY: Social Science Research Network, September 28, 2016.

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ARTICLES: JAAH SYMPOSIUM ON GERALD HORNE

A special symposium in the Journal of African American History featured the work of Gerald Horne, historian of African American and African diaspora history:

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ARTICLE: Green on Letters from a Fancy Girl

Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Gift of Mrs. W. Fitch Ingersoll [58.4] Slave Market, ca. 1850-1860. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 39 1/2 inches. as seen at Schomburg In Motion http://www.inmotionaame.org/gallery/detail.cfm;jsessionid=f8301904881471088718788?migration=3&topic=99&id=341998&type=image&metadata=show&page=2&bhcp=1
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Gift of Mrs. W. Fitch Ingersoll [58.4]
Slave Market, ca. 1850-1860. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 39 1/2 inches. as seen at Schomburg Research Center Online Exhibit In Motion: The African American Migration Experience (click for more)
Sharony Green,“‘Mr Ballard, I Am Compelled to Write Again’: Beyond Bedrooms and Brothels, a Fancy Girl Speaks.” Black Women, Gender & Families 5, no. 1 (2011).

Green writes:

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ARTICLE: Semley on “To Live and Die, Free and French”

 
Toussaint Louverture [Image fixe] : chef des noirs insurgés de Saint Domingue (entre 1796 et 1799) / Collection de Vinck. Un siècle d'histoire de France par l'estampe, 1770-1870. Vol. 44
Toussaint Louverture: chef des noirs insurgés de Saint Domingue (entre 1796 et 1799) / Collection de Vinck. Un siècle d’histoire de France par l’estampe, 1770-1870. Vol. 44 / BNF
Lorelle D. Semley, “To Live and Die, Free and French Toussaint Louverture’s 1801 Constitution and the Original Challenge of Black Citizenship.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (2013): 65–90.

Abstract:

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ARTICLE: Ginzberg on Women’s History, Mainstreams and Cutting Edges

Slavery Exhibit at the entrance to the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia / Photo Credit: Jessica Marie Johnson, April 14, 2016
Slavery Exhibit at the entrance to the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia / Photo Credit: Jessica Marie Johnson, April 14, 2016

Lori D. Ginzberg, “Mainstreams and Cutting Edges.” Journal of the Early Republic 36, no. 2 (2016): 319–25. doi:10.1353/jer.2016.0020.

Ginzberg writes:

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ARTICLE: Morgan on Race and Gender in the History of the Early Republic

Credit: "Philadelphia fashions, 1837," Edward Williams Clay via Library Company of Philadelphia Print Dept. Political Cartoons http://bit.ly/2aabmhy
Credit: “Philadelphia fashions, 1837,” Edward Williams Clay via Library Company of Philadelphia Print Dept. Political Cartoons http://bit.ly/2aabmhy
Jennifer L. Morgan, “Periodization Problems: Race and Gender in the History of the Early Republic.” Journal of the Early Republic 36, no. 2 (2016): 351–57.

Morgan writes:

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ARTICLE: Pryor on the Etymology of ‘Nigger’ in the Antebellum North

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "Effect of John Brown's invasion at the South (Nov. 19, 1859)." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 22, 2016. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-fb9f-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. “Effect of John Brown’s invasion at the South (Nov. 19, 1859).” New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 22, 2016. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-fb9f-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Pryor, Elizabeth Stordeur. “The Etymology of Nigger: Resistance, Language, and the Politics of Freedom in the Antebellum North.” Journal of the Early Republic 36, no. 2 (2016): 203–45.

Abstract:

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ARTICLE: Millward on Black Women’s History and Mourning

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Jessica Millward, “Black Women’s History and the Labor of Mourning,” Souls 18 (2016): 161- 165

Millward on mourning and doing histories of enslaved and free women of African descent:

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ARTICLE: Cardyn on Sexualized Racism/Gendered KKK Violence

"Worse Than Slavery," Harper's Weekly, October 24, 1874, page 878 via http://blackhistory.harpweek.com/7Illustrations/Reconstruction/UnionAsItWasBI.htm
“Worse Than Slavery,” Harper’s Weekly, October 24, 1874, page 878 via HarpWeek (Click Image)

 

Lisa Cardyn, “Sexualized Racism/Gendered Violence: Outraging the Body Politic in the Reconstruction South.” Michigan Law Review 100, no. 4 (February 2002): 675. doi:10.2307/1290425.

“This Article examines the calculated deployment of sexualized violence by the Reconstruction-era klans and its relationship to competing notions of justice, citizenship, and sexual propriety. Exploring what is distinctly sexual about klan terror–the sheer pervasiveness, intensity, and ideological coherence of these acts perpetrated as they were within a system of racial dominance long marked by forced sex and procreation–establishes sexualized violence as an essential aspect of the postwar Southern condition. Resonant throughout these events was the indefeasible legacy of slavery. Much as slaveowners and their minions used sexual violence and coercion in displaying and exercising mastery over their human chattel, klansmen systematically molested and violated their victims in an attempt to reinstantiate white male dominance in its antebellum form, in effect replacing the legal infrastructure of slavery that had once authorized their status with extralegal supports of their own making. Violent sex was in both of these cases a performance of status by the dominant actors and a harshly lived reality for its victims. The enduring consequences of these experiences for the freedpeople, their white sympathizers,and subsequent generations lend important insights into the nature of historical traumatization,its potency and memorialization.”

Read the rest:  JSTOR ($$)

ARTICLE: Neidenbach on Madame Marie Couvent, a Free Woman of Color in New Orleans

Board of Directors, Couvent School, 1917 Top row (standing): George Doyle, Louis Charbonnet, Walter L. Cohen, Alphonse Hopkins, Antoine Surle Lower Row (seated): Radamis Lalonier, Paul Despues, Louis J. Joubert, Barthelemy A. Rousseve, Paul Dominguez via CreoleGen.com
Board of Directors, Couvent School, 1917
Top row (standing): George Doyle, Louis Charbonnet, Walter L. Cohen, Alphonse Hopkins, Antoine Surle
Lower Row (seated): Radamis Lalonier, Paul Despues, Louis J. Joubert, Barthelemy A. Rousseve, Paul Dominguez via CreoleGen.com (click image for more)

Elizabeth C. Neidenbach, “‘Mes dernières volontés’: Testaments to the Life of Marie Couvent, a Former Slave in New Orleans.” Transatlantica. Revue d’études américaines. American Studies Journal, no. 2 (October 10, 2012). http://transatlantica.revues.org/6186.

“In her last will and testament, recorded on November 12, 1832, Marie Justine Cirnaire, Veuve Couvent left specific instructions about how her estate should be divided. After three decades in New Orleans this free woman of color had accumulated a sizeable amount of property, including slaves and land. With her will Couvent claimed a lasting legacy as a patron of African American education when she declared that a school be established on her property. That this French-speaking former slave could not sign her own name makes such an act remarkable. In fact, Couvent made two wills in New Orleans, the first dated twenty years earlier on October 26, 1812. Through a close reading of Couvent’s wills, this article will explore the life of a woman who was born in Africa, enslaved in Saint-Domingue, and died a free and wealthy slave owner in New Orleans.

As catalogs of material accumulation, acts of autobiography, and maps of social networks, these legal documents suggest the ways Couvent and other former slaves created identities as free people through property ownership and personal relationships. The differences between Couvent’s two wills are significant, revealing traces of her experiences from a slave in Saint-Domingue to a free woman in Louisiana. These discrepancies also reflect broader transformations in New Orleans. Placing the wills in their historical context not only allows me to fill the gaps in her life story, but reveals a complicated picture of how free people of color sustained their community as the center of slavery shifted into the Deep South. Together, Marie Couvent’s wills provide a rare glimpse into a life, in and out of slavery, that otherwise would have remained obscure…”

Read the rest: Transatlantica