Mar 25: International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

Today is the International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. The 2019 theme is “Remember Slavery: The Power of the Arts for Justice”

Since the time of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, the arts have been used to confront slavery, empower enslaved communities and honour those who made freedom possible. They have also been vital tools in commemorating past struggles, highlighting ongoing injustices and celebrating the achievements of people of African descent. The 2019 theme therefore draws attention to the many examples of artistic expression – including memorials, music, dance and architecture – that have helped us to remember the history and consequences of the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

Read more: Events on Remember Slavery: Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

Art we love:

Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, “De las dos aguas (Between Two Waters, 2007)”

 

Renée Stout, “House of Ghede” [Detail] (2013)
Kenyatta C. Hinkle, Tituba Becomes the Night [Detail], 2014
Jeannette Ehlers, Whip It Good, New Orleans, 2018

 

 

 

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ARTICLE: Everill on “All the baubles that they needed”: “Industriousness” and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée

Bronwen Everill, “‘All the Baubles That They Needed’: ‘Industriousness’ and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée,” Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 15, no. 4 (November 1, 2017): 714–39.

 

Abstract:

“Atlantic port cities were sites of commercial, consumer, and industrious revolutions in the eighteenth century. This essay argues that accounts of the Atlantic consumer and industrious revolutions need to include African port cities because they were an important market for consumer goods and services. The Senegambian cities of Saint-Louis and Gorée were port cities involved in the consumption of Atlantic and global goods, as well as in the provision of services for ships involved in trade, and especially the slave trade. They had a class of women involved in the economic transformation of the cities, who help illustrate the role of consumerism, as well as the possibilities for accumulation created by the institution of domestic urban slavery. It is useful to look at African port cities because their experiences of urban slavery can help us think critically about what is meant by the industrious household and about how women in different Atlantic contexts were able to accumulate and use invested capital in varying ways.”

Read: Project MUSE – “All the baubles that they needed”: “Industriousness” and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée

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