BLOGROLL: Twenty Negro or Overseer Law?: Ideas for the Classroom – The Journal of the Civil War Era

John Sacher discusses how to use the “Twenty Negro” exemption in the classroom when teaching about the U.S. Civil War:

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BLOGROLL: The Charlottesville Syllabus

University of Virginia Graduate Coalition responds to white supremacist violence in Charlottesville, VA. The list includes several books on histories of slavery and the South:

“The Charlottesville Syllabus is a resource created by the Graduate Student Coalition for Liberation to be used to educate readers about the long history of white supremacy in Charlottesville, Virginia. With resources selected and summaries written by UVa graduate students, this abridged version of the Syllabus is organized into six sections that offer contemporary and archival primary and secondary sources (articles, books, responses, a documentary, databases) and a list of important terms for discussing white supremacy. Only “additional resources” are not available online (but can be found either through JSTOR, at the library, or for purchase).

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Susan Eva O’Donovan: “To stand by silently…makes us look profoundly stupid and cruel and racist too.”

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 14, 2016, news outlets reported that a West Virginian official — Clay County Development Corporation Director Pamela Ramsey – made the following statement comparing First Lady of the United States Michelle Obama to Melania Trump on Facebook: “It will be refreshing to have a classy, beautiful, dignified First Lady in the White House. I’m tired of seeing an ape in heels.” Susan Eve O’Donovan, associate professor of history at the University of Memphis, took to Facebook to put the the statement in context when a follower questioned whether or not Ramsey’s words were racist. Her post is republished here with her permission:

[name redacted], the Ape reference is reprehensible due to centuries of ‘scientific’ racism that insistently located people of color at or at best one step above apes. See for instance this: one of the more infamous images of this kind of despicable thinking:

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TEACHING: Baucom and DuBois Course Site for “The Black Atlantic”

“Festival of Our Lady of the Rosary, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, ca. 1770s,” from “The Atlantic Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Americas” [Click]

Duke University students are writing the “Black Atlantic” online courtesy of a course taught by Ian Baucom and Laurent DuBois.

From the syllabus:

“This seminar, open to advanced undergraduate students and graduate students in all disciplines, explores the history and literature of what has come to be known as “The Black Atlantic.” Our goal will be to think through the histories of slavery and emancipation in this Atlantic world and the way they have shaped our politics and culture. Our reading will range widely, including works of history and theory as well as poetry and novels. But we will also explore how visual art, music, and various types of performance condense, transmit, and examine this history. Students in the class will be invited to participate in the “Digital Black Atlantic Project,” a collaboration between Duke, Columbia, and Harvard, which will be exploring innovative ways to use Digital Media to showcase and present scholarship, literature, and artistic production around the theme of the Black Atlantic.”

Students blog reflections over the course of the semester. Posts to date include:

Alisha Hines – Jay Z’s Oceans: Cultural Production, Historical Imaginaries, and Collective Identity

Sasha Panaram – “Ship Ahoy”: The Sounds of Slavery

David Romine – Memorials, Memory, and History in the Black Atlantic

Read more on the course, explore the site, and find the syllabus here: About « The Black Atlantic.

DIGITAL/RESOURCES: Readex Highlights Five African-American History Collections

via Readex:

In 1925 Carter G. Woodson and his Association for the Study of Negro Life and History created Negro History Week. A half century later, during the U.S. bicentennial, this formal period for recognizing African American contributions to our national history was expanded to a month. At that time President Gerald Ford asked Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” During this 2014 celebration of African American History month, Readex is pleased to highlight these five new and recent resources:

The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society

Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922: From the Library Company of Philadelphia

African American Periodicals, 1825-1995

African American Newspapers, 1827-1998

Caribbean Newspapers, Series 1, 1718-1876: From the American Antiquarian Society

Read full descriptions here: Celebrating African American History Month: Five Acclaimed Research and Teaching Collections for African American Studies | Readex

RESOURCE: Timeline of African American History Across North Carolina

Jones, Thomas H. The Experience of Thomas Jones, Who Was a Slave for Forty-Three Years. New Bedford, CT: E. Anthony & Sons, Printers, 1885.

Jennifer Larson highlights African American History Across North Carolina in a timeline annotated with material from the digital collection DocSouth: Documenting the American South:

North Carolina’s African American heritage is rich and diverse. In slavery and in freedom, black residents Continue reading

REVIEW: Johnson on STN’s 18th Century French Book Trade Database

Image
“Europeans Purchasing a Slave Woman, late 18th cent.,” Guillaume Raynal, Histoire Philosophique et Politique . . . des Europeens dans les Deux Indes (Geneva, 1780), vol. 7, p. 377. (Copy at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University) Image Reference H005 as shown on http://www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.

From The French Book Trade in Enlightenment Europe website:

The French Book Trade in Enlightenment Europe project uses database technology to map the trade of the Société Typographique de Neuchâtel (STN), a celebrated Swiss publishing house that operated between 1769 and 1794.

As the STN sold the works of other publishers alongside its own editions, their archives can be considered a representative source for studying the history of the book trade and dissemination of ideas in the late Enlightenment.

Using state of the art database, web interface and GIS technology, the project provides a user-friendly resource for use by scholars, teachers and students of French literature and history, book history, the Enlightenment and bibliography more generally…

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