EDITED: Mann, Bay, and More on Rethinking the African Diaspora (2001)

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African Diaspora, Ph.D. is revisiting scholarship that has shaped the study of people of African descent across time and place….

Mann, Kristin, and Edna G. Bay, eds. Rethinking the African Diaspora: The Making of a Black Atlantic World in the Bight of Benin and Brazil. Psychology Press, 2001.

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EDITED: Frederickson and Walters on Slavery, Gender, and Resistance

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Frederickson, Mary E., and Delores M. Walters, eds. Gendered Resistance: Women, Slavery, and the Legacy of Margaret Garner. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2013.

Via University of Illinois Press:

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EDITED: Bryant, O’Toole, and Vinson on Africans to Spanish America

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Sherwin K. Bryant, Rachel Sarah O’Toole, and Ben Vinson, eds. Africans to Spanish America: Expanding the Diaspora. University of Illinois Press, 2014.

via University of Illinois Press:

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EDITED: Campbell and Elbourne on Sex, Power and Slavery

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Gwyn Campbell and Elizabeth Elbourne, eds. Sex, Power, and Slavery. Ohio University Press, 2014.
via Ohio University Press:

Sexual exploitation was and is a critical feature of enslavement. Across many different societies, slaves were considered to own neither their bodies nor their children, even if many struggled to resist. At the same time, paradoxes abound: for example, in some societies to bear the children of a master was a potential route to manumission for some women. Sex, Power, and Slavery is the first history of slavery and bondage to take sexuality seriously.

Twenty-six authors from diverse scholarly backgrounds look at the vexed, traumatic intersections of the histories of slavery and of sexuality. They argue that such intersections mattered profoundly and, indeed, that slavery cannot be understood without adequate attention to sexuality. Sex, Power, and Slavery brings into conversation historians of the slave trade, art historians, and scholars of childhood and contemporary sex trafficking. The book merges work on the Atlantic world and the Indian Ocean world and enables rich comparisons and parallels between these diverse areas.

EDITED: Radcliffe, Scott, and Werner on Black Intellectuals in the Atlantic World

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via U Penn Press:

Anywhere But Here brings together new scholarship on the cross-cultural experiences of intellectuals of African descent since the eighteenth century. The book embraces historian Paul Gilroy’s prominent thesis in The Black Atlantic and posits arguments beyond The Black Atlantic’s traditional organization and symbolism.

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EDITED: Meuwese and Fortin on Biographies & the Atlantic World

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Mark Meuwese and Jeffrey A. Fortin, eds. Atlantic Biographies: Individuals and Peoples in the Atlantic World. Leiden: BRILL, 2013.

via BRILL:

EDITED: Robertson and Klein on Women and Slavery in Africa

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African Diaspora, Ph.D. is revisiting scholarship that has shaped the study of people of African descent across time and place.

Claire C. Robertson and Martin A. Klein, eds. Women and Slavery in Africa. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1985.

In a 1985 review of the volume, Patrick Manning wrote:

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EDITED: Fradera and Schmidt-Nowara on Slavery in Spain’s Atlantic Empire

Josep Maria Fradera and Christopher Schmidt-Nowara, eds. Slavery and Antislavery in Spain’s Atlantic Empire. New York: Berghahn Books, 2013.

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EDITED: Medard, Derat, Vernet and Ballarin on Slavery in East Africa and the Indian Ocean

Henri Medard, Marie-Laure Derat, Thomas Vernet, and Marie Pierre Ballarin, eds. Traites et esclavages en Afrique orientale et dans l’océan Indien. Paris: Karthala, 2013.

Aucune région au monde n’a connu une histoire aussi longue de la traite et de l’esclavage que l’Afrique orientale et l’océan Indien. Très loin des modèles simplificateurs du complexe atlantique, les sociétés de l’océan Indien ont éprouvé des modalités de traites et des situations serviles très diverses, où tous les systèmes esclavagistes européens, orientaux et africains se mêlent. Les Africains et les Malgaches sont majoritaires parmi les esclaves mais ils côtoient des compagnons d’infortune d’origines géographiques extrêmement variées, et en particulier des Asiatiques. Les esclaves sont redistribués et vendus aux quatre coins de l’océan Indien mais aussi vers l’Atlantique, alors que se développent en Afrique de façon croissante les logiques serviles qui connaissent leur apothéose à Zanzibar au XIXe siècle.

Cet ouvrage complète magistralement une historiographie qui demeure largement dominée par les études sur l’Atlantique. Par le biais d’une approche globale, océanique comme continentale, il renouvelle en profondeur les questions de la traite et de l’esclavage ainsi que de leurs mutations complexes du XVe au XXIe siècle dans l’espace de l’Afrique orientale et de l’océan Indien. Il offre ainsi au public francophone une approche novatrice et percutante à partir d’études de cas originales et fouillées menées par les meilleurs spécialistes de ces questions.

EDITED: Araujo on the Politics of Remembering Slavery

"Hallelujah" Stone Sculpture

Ana Lucia Araujo, ed. Politics of Memory: Making Slavery Visible in the Public Space. Routledge, 2012.

via Routledge:

The public memory of slavery and the Atlantic slave trade, which some years ago could be observed especially in North America, has slowly emerged into a transnational phenomenon now encompassing Europe, Africa, and Latin America, and even Asia – allowing the populations of African descent, organized groups, governments, non-governmental organizations and societies in these different regions to individually and collectively update and reconstruct the slave past.

This edited volume examines the recent transnational emergence of the public memory of slavery, shedding light on the work of memory produced by groups of individuals who are descendants of slaves. The chapters in this book explore how the memory of the enslaved and slavers is shaped and displayed in the public space not only in the former slave societies but also in the regions that provided captives to the former American colonies and European metropoles. Through the analysis of exhibitions, museums, monuments, accounts, and public performances, the volume makes sense of the political stakes involved in the phenomenon of memorialization of slavery and the slave trade in the public sphere.

 

Featured Image Credit: “Hallelujah” Stone Sculpture near the site of the proposed U.S. Slavery Museum in Fredericksburg, VA / Robert A. Martin/AP via “Competing for History” | Upstart Magazine