DIGITAL: Free People of Color in Louisiana

Digital project on free people of color in Louisiana:

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DIGITAL: Gaffield’s Dessalines Reader

Hosted, organized, and compiled by Julia Gaffield:

“Jean-Jacques Dessalines is one of the Haitian Revolution’s most poorly and least understood heroes. Beginning with his ascent to power and continuing into the twenty-first century, Dessalines has been criticized for his use of violence during and after the Revolution as well as for his alleged political incompetence. Much of the criticism is a product of racist beliefs about his “African” character despite the fact that we do not know with certainty whether he was born in Saint-Domingue or in West Africa. His “Africanness” is almost always pitted against the “civility” and “moderation” of the earlier revolutionary leader Toussaint Louverture….”

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DIGITAL: Network Visualization of the Civil War Governors of Kentucky 

“On August 10, 2017, my partner Sara Carlstead Brumfield and I delivered this presentation at Digital Humanities 2017 in Montreal.  The presentation was coauthored by Patrick Lewis, Whitney Smith, Tony Curtis, and Jeff Dycus, our collaborators at Kentucky Historical Society…

“The Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition was conceived to address a problem in the historical record of Civil War-era Kentucky that originates from the conflict between the slaveholding, unionist elite with the federal government. During the course of the war, they had fallen out completely. As a result, at the end of the war the people who wrote the histories of the war—even though they had been Unionists—ended up wishing they had seceded, so they wrote these pro-Confederate histories that biased the historical record. What this means is that the secondary sources are these sort-of Lost Cause narratives that don’t reflect the lived experience of the people of Kentucky during the Civil War. So in order to find about that experience, we have to go back to the primary sources.”

Of special interest:

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NEWS/DIGITAL: The Disturbing History Of Confederate Monuments, In A Single Image

“Symbols of the Confederacy have retained their ugly power for 150 years, and the number of monuments has actually increased at crucial moments in recent American history. An infographic from the Southern Poverty Law Centermaps out Confederate iconography, including monuments and names of schools, from the end of the Civil War in 1861 to 2016–revealing that the increase in tributes to the Confederacy mirrors important moments in civil rights…”

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BLOGROLL: Roberts on Preservation and Social Justice| National Trust for Historic Preservation

Andrea Roberts, founder of the Texas Freedom Colonies Project and a scholar of heritage conservation and urban planning discusses historic preservation and social justice:

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DIGITAL: The Caribbean Memory Project

“The Caribbean Memory Project (CMP) is the Caribbean’s first crowd-sourced cultural heritage research platform. It is designed to activate and engage the memory of cultural heritage among a mixed audience and to aid in counteracting the effects of erasure and forgetting occurring in a growing number of contemporary Caribbean communities. The CMP is motivated by enduring questions of citizenship and its related responsibilities—to a family, a community, a country—which are central to the conceptualization and sustainable enactment of Caribbean identity.  The CMP’s foundational questions include:”

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Ancestry.com Unites the Founding Fathers’ Descendants in One Room | Inverse

This 4th of July in the United States, watch Ancestry.com’s new ad for the Declaration of Independence and read this article by Emily Gaudette about Ancestry and independence’s complicated complications:

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