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Shepherd Interview on the Morant Bay Rebellion in The Voice

Verene Shepherd, professor of social history at the University of the West Indies, reflects on the 150th anniversary of Morant Bay and the execution of Paul Bogle… What was, in your view, the main trigger for the rebellion? VS: First of all, it was a war, not a rebellion. Both sides were armed and the word “war” has been enshrined in the oral history of … Continue reading Shepherd Interview on the Morant Bay Rebellion in The Voice

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DIGITAL/NEWS: Slave Trade Database to Expand, Update Website | The Emory Wheel

The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, an online database providing information about slaves and slave trading voyages, will soon expand to include information about intra-American slave trade as well as have a new accessibility. The online database is supervised by two Emory faculty members in partnership with international scholars. The project investigators — David Eltis, Robert… Read the rest: Slave Trade Database to Expand, Update Website … Continue reading DIGITAL/NEWS: Slave Trade Database to Expand, Update Website | The Emory Wheel

A Michigan State University student holds a sign reading "I Hope I Don't Get Killed Because I'm Black Today." On December 6, 2014, MSU students organized a series of marches and die-ins to protest the deaths of Eric Garner, Mike Brown, and others killed by police violence; and in solidarity with activists across the country.  Photo Credit: Jessica Marie Johnson / December 6, 2014

Berry and Morgan: #Blacklivesmatter Till They Don’t: Slavery’s Lasting Legacy

“We live in a nation that has yet to grapple with the history of slavery and its afterlife.” – Daina Ramey Berry and Jennifer L. Morgan

In an essay for The American Prospect, slavery scholars Daina Ramey Berry and Jennifer L. Morgan place #blacklivesmatter protests around the world in context with “the historical value of black life and the casual killing of Eric Garner:”

“In less than a month, our nation will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery. This should be a time of celebratory reflection, yet Wednesday night, after another grand jury failed to see the value of African-American life, protesters took to the streets chanting, “Black lives matter!…”

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Interview: The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others | The UCSB Current

H/T – The Repeating Islands – Andrea Estrada interviews Esther Lezra on her new book The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others (Routledge, 2014): “It was important to show that the representational patterns that we use today are inheritors of an early representational rhetoric that was intrinsically tied up with material violence and injustice endured by peoples who were subjected to empire and colonialism,” Lezra said. … Continue reading Interview: The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others | The UCSB Current

Penn Gazette Feature On Salamishah Tillet: Scholar, Teacher, Activist

 

“As an undergraduate at Penn in the 1990s, Salamishah Tillet C’96 experienced some of the best and very worst that a young person’s college years can offer. It was here that she made lasting friendships and found the inspiring classes and mentors that sparked her ambition to become a scholar and teacher herself. And it was also here that, during her freshman year, she was sexually assaulted by a fellow student—a trauma compounded by a second rape while she was on a study-abroad program in Kenya during her junior year.

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Stephanie M. H. Camp (1967-2014)

University of Washington history professor Stephanie M. H. Camp passed away on April 2nd. Camp was the author of Closer to Freedom: Enslaved Women and Everyday Resistance in the Plantation South (University of North Carolina Press, 2004, also profiled on #ADPhD here). Camp also edited, with Edward Baptist, New Studies in the History of Slavery (University of Georgia Press, 2006).

Selections from her obituary in The Seattle Times:

“She was a well-known feminist historian who wrote a groundbreaking book on enslaved women in the antebellum South, and a social-justice activist who dared to take controversial stands. But Stephanie Camp was also known for her love of popular culture and her sense of adventure and for hosting great parties.

The University of Washington history professor died April 2 of cancer at the age of 46.

Professor Camp’s book, “Closer to Freedom: Enslaved Women and Everyday Resistance in the Plantation South,” which is in its second printing, led to a new understanding of how enslaved women resisted their captivity in the 19th century. It was cited not only for the quality of its scholarship but also for the beauty of the writing.

The book “transformed the field of American social history,” said Chandan Reddy, an associate professor of English at the UW….”

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