BLOGROLL: Class on Slavery at MIT | MIT News

Findings show founder William Barton Rogers possessed enslaved persons before coming to MIT; research, community dialogue to ensue:

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AUDIO: Fuentes on Colonial Port Cities and Slavery | Ben Franklin’s World

Marisa Fuentes discusses Barbados, port cities, and slavery with Liz Covart on the podcast Ben Franklin’s World:

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DIGITAL/CONF: Story Map for Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities

Moya Bailey, P. Gabrielle Foreman, Jessica Marie Johnson, Liz Losh, Marisa Parham,  and more present at the OIEAHC/Equality Lab conference Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities, October 26-28, 2017.

Johnson writes:

“We’ve got a map!!! Thank you Liz Losh and the team at the Equality Lab for this really amazing visualization of our DH work. Hope to see you all at Race, Memory and the Digital Humanities in a couple of weeks!”

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Amrita Chakrabarti Myers: “…they would have been abolitionists.”

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 18, 2016, in light of the recent election, Amrita Chakrabarti Myers, associate professor of history at Indiana University-Bloomington offered this reminder on Facebook of what standing up against injustice has meant, across time and place.

I’ve often heard people say that if they’d been alive during slavery, they would have been abolitionists.
Continue reading “Amrita Chakrabarti Myers: “…they would have been abolitionists.””

AUDIO: American Exodus: A History of Emigration [rebroadcast] by BackStory

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 11, 2016, in light of the recent election, the BackStory podcast rebroadcast its episode on emigration and immigration, which included stories on free blacks who sailed to Liberia during the 19th century:

“With Donald Trump vowing to keep undocumented Mexicans out of the U.S. with a wall and Hillary Clinton promising the same immigrants a path to citizenship, immigration was a big issue in the 2016 presidential election. But what about the flip side – emigration?

“In this episode of BackStory, we ask who’s chosen to leave the U.S. and what parts of their American identities they took with them – from the Loyalists who fled to Canada in the wake of the American Revolution, and the free blacks who sailed to Liberia in search of true freedom, to the Depression-era refugees who moved to the Soviet Union.”

Listen below and click here for more: http://backstoryradio.org/shows/american-exodus/

 

 

 

 

Johnson: “Yet Lives and Fights”: Riots, Resistance, and Reconstruction | @AAIHS

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 12, 2016, in light of the recent election, Jessica Marie Johnson published this essay on the African American Intellectual History Society blog:

Continue reading “Johnson: “Yet Lives and Fights”: Riots, Resistance, and Reconstruction | @AAIHS”

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