DIGITAL/CONF: Story Map for Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities

Moya Bailey, P. Gabrielle Foreman, Jessica Marie Johnson, Liz Losh, Marisa Parham,  and more present at the OIEAHC/Equality Lab conference Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities, October 26-28, 2017.

Johnson writes:

“We’ve got a map!!! Thank you Liz Losh and the team at the Equality Lab for this really amazing visualization of our DH work. Hope to see you all at Race, Memory and the Digital Humanities in a couple of weeks!”

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ARTICLE: Holden on African-American Children and the Southampton Rebellion of 1831

Vanessa M. Holden. “Generation, resistance, and survival: African-American children and the Southampton Rebellion of 1831.” Slavery & Abolition pp. 1-47 (2017)

Abstract:

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Amrita Chakrabarti Myers: “…they would have been abolitionists.”

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 18, 2016, in light of the recent election, Amrita Chakrabarti Myers, associate professor of history at Indiana University-Bloomington offered this reminder on Facebook of what standing up against injustice has meant, across time and place.

I’ve often heard people say that if they’d been alive during slavery, they would have been abolitionists.
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AUDIO: American Exodus: A History of Emigration [rebroadcast] by BackStory

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 11, 2016, in light of the recent election, the BackStory podcast rebroadcast its episode on emigration and immigration, which included stories on free blacks who sailed to Liberia during the 19th century:

“With Donald Trump vowing to keep undocumented Mexicans out of the U.S. with a wall and Hillary Clinton promising the same immigrants a path to citizenship, immigration was a big issue in the 2016 presidential election. But what about the flip side – emigration?

“In this episode of BackStory, we ask who’s chosen to leave the U.S. and what parts of their American identities they took with them – from the Loyalists who fled to Canada in the wake of the American Revolution, and the free blacks who sailed to Liberia in search of true freedom, to the Depression-era refugees who moved to the Soviet Union.”

Listen below and click here for more: http://backstoryradio.org/shows/american-exodus/

 

 

 

 

Johnson: “Yet Lives and Fights”: Riots, Resistance, and Reconstruction | @AAIHS

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 12, 2016, in light of the recent election, Jessica Marie Johnson published this essay on the African American Intellectual History Society blog:

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Petrella on Slavery, Democracy, and the Racialized Roots of the Electoral College | @AAIHS

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 14, 2016, in light of the recent election, the Christopher F. Petrella published this essay on the African American Intellectual History Society blog:

Petrella writes:

“In a direct election system, the North would have outnumbered the South (which had a large population but far fewer eligible voters), whose roughly 550,000 enslaved black people were disenfranchised. Delegates from the South generally supported Madison’s idea of the Electoral College over a direct election system because it was based solely on population volume, not citizenship status or enfranchisement. In conjunction, and at Madison’s urging, the convention agreed to count each enslaved black person as three-fifths of a citizen for the purpose of calculating each state’s representation in the Electoral College and in the allotment of congressional seats.”

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Susan Eva O’Donovan: “To stand by silently…makes us look profoundly stupid and cruel and racist too.”

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 14, 2016, news outlets reported that a West Virginian official — Clay County Development Corporation Director Pamela Ramsey – made the following statement comparing First Lady of the United States Michelle Obama to Melania Trump on Facebook: “It will be refreshing to have a classy, beautiful, dignified First Lady in the White House. I’m tired of seeing an ape in heels.” Susan Eve O’Donovan, associate professor of history at the University of Memphis, took to Facebook to put the the statement in context when a follower questioned whether or not Ramsey’s words were racist. Her post is republished here with her permission:

[name redacted], the Ape reference is reprehensible due to centuries of ‘scientific’ racism that insistently located people of color at or at best one step above apes. See for instance this: one of the more infamous images of this kind of despicable thinking:

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Alex Gil: “This double voice that could pass the censors was key to their survival.”

In response to the recent election, #ADPhD is sharing reflections, short takes, and responses from scholars of slavery. To submit yours, click here.

On November 12 and 14, 2016, Alex Gil, Digital Scholarship Coordinator at Columbia University and one of the editors of sx:archipelagos (the born-digital iteration of Small Axe) posted these reflections on Facebook. They are republished here with his permission.
fonds Destribats
Tropiques, 1941

On November 12, 2016

Yo me he pasado una gran parte de mi vida estudiando a un solo poeta, Aimé Césaire. En 1941, cuando los fascistas blancos ya ocupaban su isla de Martinique, este poeta se dedicó a escribir una obra de teatro en secreto:

“Et les chiens se taisaient” (Y los perros se callaban).
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