BLOGROLL: Two Visions of Abolition and Emancipation #OAH18

Evan Turïano reports on #OAH2018 panels, including the “State of the Field: Abolition and Emancipation” for Muster:

Continue reading “BLOGROLL: Two Visions of Abolition and Emancipation #OAH18”

Advertisements

AWARD: 2018 AAIHS Award Recipients Announced

Congratulations Dr. Sasha Turner for winning the 2018 Maria Stewart Journal Article Prize for her article “The Nameless and the Forgotten: Maternal Grief, Sacred Protection, and the Archive of Slavery,” Slavery and Abolition, 38: 1 (2017): 232-250.

Continue reading “AWARD: 2018 AAIHS Award Recipients Announced”

A Storify: Tweets from #UnboundJHU held at JHU March 8-9, 2018

Click here for tweets from #unboundJHU held at Johns Hopkins University, March 8-9, 2018. This conference was sponsored by the Center for Africana Studies and co-organized by Katrina Bell McDonald, Tera Jordan, and Jessica Marie Johnson. For more: http://bit.ly/unboundjhu (Storify compiled by @jmjafrx)

Featured Image: Tera Hunter, Professor of History at Princeton University and author of Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century

Note: Storify is closing up shop on May 17, 2018 and tweets tend to disappear from Twitter after 10-14 days. Screenshot your favorite tweets and download any media as needed for your own archive.

DIGITAL/CONF: Story Map for Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities

Moya Bailey, P. Gabrielle Foreman, Jessica Marie Johnson, Liz Losh, Marisa Parham,  and more present at the OIEAHC/Equality Lab conference Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities, October 26-28, 2017.

Johnson writes:

“We’ve got a map!!! Thank you Liz Losh and the team at the Equality Lab for this really amazing visualization of our DH work. Hope to see you all at Race, Memory and the Digital Humanities in a couple of weeks!”

Continue reading “DIGITAL/CONF: Story Map for Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities”

VIDEO/CONF: Scenes at 20 – Inspirations, Riffs, and Reverberations

This symposium celebrates the 20th anniversary of Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America and its impact on studies of Black lives in the past, present, and future. Please join us as we consider the work’s impact within its intergenerational intellectual context and theorize new possibilities for Black life and Black freedom in these perilous times.

 

For more on the conference: http://www.scenesat20.com/
Footage from the panels is available and livestreams are available for each day.
via YouTube:

Continue reading “VIDEO/CONF: Scenes at 20 – Inspirations, Riffs, and Reverberations”

VIDEO: Intellectual History of Black Women: An International Conference

Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog (Archived)

Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women: An International Conference
April 28-30, 2011
Location: Columbia University’s Faculty House

“This conference features emerging work on black women’s contributions to black thought, political mobilization, creative work and gender theory. Scholarly Panels, Roundtables, and Keynote delivered by Professor Elizabeth Alexander will focus on black women as intellectuals across a broad geography including Africa, the Caribbean, North and South America, and Europe. Over a period of three days we aim to piece together a history of black women’s thought and culture that maps the distinctive concerns and historical forces that have shaped black women’s ideas and intellectual activities.

The conference is sponsored by Columbia University’s Center for the Critical Analysis of Social Difference (CCASD), Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS), Institute for Research on Women and Gender (IRWAG), Institute for Social and Economic Research Policy (ISERP), Office of the Provost, and History…

View original post 12 more words

TALK: The Race for Digitality | Roopika Risam

african-diaspora-2-banner1

At African Diaspora 2.0, Roopika Risam of #DHPoco: Postcolonial Digital Humanities discussed the tension between digital humanities and African diaspora studies.

An excerpt:

“…In the race for digitality, we find ourselves struggling to understand the relationship between our deep investments in discourses like intersectional feminism or critical race theory and digital humanities. The burden of representation falls on us. Our acts of representation should not be bids for power but for what [Barbara] Christian would call the need to become empowered – “seeing oneself as capable and having the right to determine one’s life” (61). At stake for us is not power in the putative hierarchies of digital humanities, rather the empowerment that our work on the African diaspora can effect.

To empower – ourselves, a new generation of scholars, diasporic subjects – we need to embrace multiplicity and the specificities of diaspora. We must answer Christian’s question, “For whom are we doing what we are doing?” (61) to make legible all our scholarship has to offer. This is, in part, a question of method – which tools do we use? We may recall Audre Lorde’s statement “the master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house,” which comes up often in critiques of digital humanities, but we must not mistake the master. It’s not digital humanities – it’s the effects of white supremacy on knowledge production. That’s where we are called to intervene. But how…”

Read the rest –  The Race for Digitality | Roopika Risam.

For more on African Diaspora 2.0 Symposium hosted by the Harriet Tubman Institute at York University, click here.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: