DIGITAL/BLOGROLL: Interactive Maps Chronicle Frederick Douglass in Maryland

Lawrence Jackson’s course on Frederick Douglass covered by Hopkins Hub:
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DIGITAL: Gaffield’s Dessalines Reader

Hosted, organized, and compiled by Julia Gaffield:

“Jean-Jacques Dessalines is one of the Haitian Revolution’s most poorly and least understood heroes. Beginning with his ascent to power and continuing into the twenty-first century, Dessalines has been criticized for his use of violence during and after the Revolution as well as for his alleged political incompetence. Much of the criticism is a product of racist beliefs about his “African” character despite the fact that we do not know with certainty whether he was born in Saint-Domingue or in West Africa. His “Africanness” is almost always pitted against the “civility” and “moderation” of the earlier revolutionary leader Toussaint Louverture….”

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VIDEO: The Heritage of Slavery (1968) w/ Fannie Lou Hamer & Lerone Bennett, Jr.

From 1968, a look at slavery in Charleston, SC and sharecropping in Mississippi from 1968 (via ReelBlack):

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SOURCE: Nat Turner and the Southampton Revolt

August 21st marks the start of the Southampton revolt. On this day, Nat Turner and other enslaved rebels met to plan their revolt. The revolt itself began the next day (August 22) and lasted less than 48 hours. 

Read on for the 1831 report from the Richmond Enquirer:

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SOURCE: Frederick Douglass on How Congress Can Fight a ‘Treacherous President’ – The Atlantic

The Atlantic reprints Frederick Douglass’s 1866 essay on how Congress can cope with a chief executive who refuses to recognize the rights of all citizens:

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SOURCE/DIGITAL: Issue 3.0 of A Colony in Crisis: The Saint-Domingue Grain Shortage of 1789

A Colony in Crisis…

“…is designed to provide online access to both the French originals and the English translations of key primary sources dealing with the grain shortage faced by the colony of Saint-Domingue in 1789, which are found under the Translations menu. Alongside the French original, each translation is presented with a brief historical introduction to situate the reader in the time period and help understand how this particular pamphlet fits into the episode. Each document has been reviewed by one of the scholars on our Board of Advisors. These pamphlets are primarily drawn from the University of Maryland’s Special Collections, although related items available at other institutions have been included as well. Please see our Worldcat list if you are interested in the physical items.”

On Issue 3.0 via the Introduction by Marlene L. Daut:
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