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DIGITAL: Freedom on the Move and Slave Resistance in New Orleans

Originally posted on Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog:
“This interactive Google map shows original newspaper ads for fugitive slaves and contemporary locations of identified sites. Click on the name of a fugitive from the list or on a map point to reveal the ad and corresponding site. Green markers indicate points of flight; red markers, points of refuge. These entries have been selected from roughly nine… Continue reading DIGITAL: Freedom on the Move and Slave Resistance in New Orleans

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BOOK: Lightfoot on Slavery and Freedom in Antigua

Natasha Lightfoot, Troubling Freedom: Antigua and the Aftermath of British Emancipation. Durham: Duke University Press Books, 2015. via Duke University Press: “In 1834 Antigua became the only British colony in the Caribbean to move directly from slavery to full emancipation. Immediate freedom, however, did not live up to its promise, as it did not guarantee any level of stability or autonomy, and the implementation of … Continue reading BOOK: Lightfoot on Slavery and Freedom in Antigua

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Shepherd Interview on the Morant Bay Rebellion in The Voice

Verene Shepherd, professor of social history at the University of the West Indies, reflects on the 150th anniversary of Morant Bay and the execution of Paul Bogle… What was, in your view, the main trigger for the rebellion? VS: First of all, it was a war, not a rebellion. Both sides were armed and the word “war” has been enshrined in the oral history of … Continue reading Shepherd Interview on the Morant Bay Rebellion in The Voice

Bonner on Frederick Douglass’s Compressed, Expanding World | @AAIHS

Christopher Bonner writes: “As Douglass saw it, technological development enhanced political work. Steamships brought news from Europe in as few as fifteen days, which struck him as an immediate kind of knowledge that allowed a localized movement to exert a broad and seemingly instant influence. “A revolution now cannot be confined to the place or the people where it may commence, but flashes with lightning … Continue reading Bonner on Frederick Douglass’s Compressed, Expanding World | @AAIHS

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Dunbar on Black Slavery and the General Viewing Audience | Process

Erica Armstrong Dunbar (University of Delaware) at Process History on slavery in films: Shortly after its premier, Roots was plagued with controversy regarding the authenticity of Haley’s research and scholarship. But families like mine held fast to the importance of the miniseries. We had no alternatives. Many criticized the romanticized relationships that appeared in Roots, but it didn’t matter to us. We were grateful. Grateful … Continue reading Dunbar on Black Slavery and the General Viewing Audience | Process

A GROUP OF CONFEDERATE WOMEN.
MISS S. B. C. PRESTON. MISS ISABELLA D. MARTIN. MRS. JEFFERSON DAVIS. MRS. LOUISA S. MCCORD. MRS. FRANCIS W. PICKENS. MRS. DAVID R WILLIAMS. As seen in Chesnut, Mary Boykin Miller. Diary from Dixie, as Written by Mary Boykin Chesnut, Wife of James Chesnut, Jr., United States Senator from South Carolina, 1859-1861, and Afterward an Aide to Jefferson Davis and a Brigadier-General in the Confederate Army. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1905. (Accessed 2015 October 21 on DocSouth - click for item)

RADIO/PODCAST: Jones-Rogers on White Women’s Roles in Slavery on Against the Grain

On Against the Grain, Stephanie Jones-Rogers (University of California, Berkeley) discusses white women slaveowners in the U.S. South and their role as slave traders: Although white women have been largely excluded from histories of the domestic U.S. slave trade, they were in fact active participants in the buying and selling of enslaved Blacks. So argues Stephanie Jones-Rogers; she also elucidates the power slave owners had … Continue reading RADIO/PODCAST: Jones-Rogers on White Women’s Roles in Slavery on Against the Grain