DIGITAL: African American Communities

Digital project focused on Black Life in U.S. cities:
Continue reading “DIGITAL: African American Communities”
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BOOK CHAPTER: Rogers and King on Women of Color in 18th Century Saint-Domingue

Dominique Rogers and Stewart King. “Housekeepers, Merchants, Rentières: Free Women of Color in the Port Cities of Saint-Domingue, 1750-1790.” In Women in Port: Gendering Communities, Economies, and Social Networks in Atlantic Port Cities, 1500-1800, edited by Douglas Catterall and Jody Campbell, 357–98. BRILL, 2012.

via Brill:

Continue reading “BOOK CHAPTER: Rogers and King on Women of Color in 18th Century Saint-Domingue”

AUDIO: Berry and Harris on Urban Slavery | 15 Minute History

 

Caption: Sale of Slaves at Charleston, South Carolina. In The Illustrated London News (Nov. 29, 1856), vol. 29, p. 555. (Copy in Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library) as shown on www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library. (Click image for details)
Caption: Sale of Slaves at Charleston, South Carolina. In The Illustrated London News (Nov. 29, 1856), vol. 29, p. 555. (Copy in Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library) as shown on http://www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library. (Click image for details)

 

Daina Ramey Berry and Leslie Brown discuss urban slavery in the United States on 15 Minute History:

“When most people think about slavery in the United States, they think of large agricultural plantations and picture slaves working in the fields harvesting crops. But for a significant number of slaves, their experience involved working in houses, factories, and on the docks of the South’s booming cities. Urban slavery, as it has come to be known, is often overlooked in the annals of slave experience.

This week’s guests Daina Ramey Berry, from UT’s Department of History, and Leslie Harris, from Emory University, have spent the past year collaborating on a new study aimed at re-discovering this forgotten aspect of slave experience in the United States.”

Listen to the podcast and read the transcript here: Episode 54: Urban Slavery in the Antebellum United States | 15 Minute History.

Weekend Reading: The Public Archive on “Radical Black Cities”

This week, The Public Archive published its fourth installment on Radical Black Reading.  The subject was race, urbanity, black geographies, and sense of place:

In this, The Public Archive’s fourth installment of Radical Black Reading,* we hope to contribute to an informal conversation about the history, plight, and future of Black cities – and towards the imagination of a radical Black city. It is a conversation taking place (if only in disparate, scattered form) across the African diaspora. The question of Black urban space, of Black geographies, and of the possibility of a radical Black city adds an urgent element to discussions of the nature of the urban, while the very survival of the Black city becomes a radical act of hope and resistance.

Several books of relevance were listed including Alejandro de la Fuente’s Havana and the Atlantic in the Sixteenth Century (2011), Leslie Harris’s African or American? Black Identity and Political Activism in New York City, 1784-1861 (2010), and Carla Peterson’s Black Gotham: A Family History of African Americans in Nineteenth-Century New York City.  De la Fuente, Harris and Peterson are also featured here, here and here at #ADPhD.

Browse the full list here or view installments here, here, and here.

 Image: David Osagie, Occupy Nigeria (2011) via The Public Archive

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