BLOGROLL: Ortner on Recovering Frances Ellen Watkins Harper’s Forest Leaves

Johanna Ortner on Harper in Commonplace: "Frances Ellen Watkins Harper’s first book of poems had been considered lost to history for well over one hundred years. Johanna Ortner shares the tale of recovering this incredibly valuable text–and shares the text itself–with the readers of Common-place." Read: http://common-place.org/book/lost-no-more-recovering-frances-ellen-watkins-harpers-forest-leaves/

BLOGROLL: Harris on Whitewashing History of the Founders

Leslie Harris writes: "Tonight, the George Washington Book Prize of $50,000 will be awarded to Kevin J. Hayes for his book “George Washington, a Life in Books,” one of seven finalists selected as “the past year’s best-written works on the nation’s founding era.” Although over four decades of research on the history of slavery, race … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Harris on Whitewashing History of the Founders

BLOGROLL: Ramey on Teaching and “Explaining the New Lynching Memorial to My Son”

Daina Ramey Berry writes: "Is there any good way to teach children about lynching? After attending the opening of a powerful new memorial and museum, which together explore some of the most painful aspects of American history, I wondered about the prospect of returning there with my 12-year-old son. My husband and I wanted him … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Ramey on Teaching and “Explaining the New Lynching Memorial to My Son”

BLOGROLL: Greenwald and Rothman Argue New Orleans should acknowledge its lead role in the slave trade

Erin Greenwald and Joshua Rothman write: "Concerned that overcrowded, squalid, and disease-ridden slave pens and prisons were a public health threat, the New Orleans City Council in 1829 banned the lodging and public exposure of slaves for sale or hire within what were then city limits, now the French Quarter. That regulation effectively pushed slave … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Greenwald and Rothman Argue New Orleans should acknowledge its lead role in the slave trade

BLOGROLL: Hunter on “Some Did Choose to Return to Slavery Because They Chose Family Over Everything”

Tera Hunter writes: "It is 1857, and Kanye, a carpenter, has finally saved up enough money to buy his freedom from Massa West. Trouble is, he has to leave his wife, Kimba, and five children on the plantation until he can buy them out of slavery as well. "Kanye is free from the constant threat … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Hunter on “Some Did Choose to Return to Slavery Because They Chose Family Over Everything”

AUDIO: Zora Neale Hurston’s Story of the Last Slave Ship Survivor – SoundCloud

With Cheryl Sterling, Deborah Plant, Glory Edim, and Sylviane Diouf: "Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo” is one of Zora Neale Hurston’s most important works of non-fiction that has never been published until today. Hurston recorded the story in Alabama in the late 1920s. It's a collection of interviews with a man named … Continue reading AUDIO: Zora Neale Hurston’s Story of the Last Slave Ship Survivor – SoundCloud

BOOK: Scott on the Common Wind of Black Radicalism During Slavery

Finally! Julius Scott, A Common Wind: Afro-American Organization in the Revolution Against Slavery (Verso, 2018). via Verso: "Out of the grey expanse of official records in Spanish, English and French, The Common Wind provides a gripping and colourful account of inter-continental communication networks that tied together the free and enslaved masses of the new world. … Continue reading BOOK: Scott on the Common Wind of Black Radicalism During Slavery

VIDEO: Rusert on Fugitive Science, Black Freedom and Early African American Culture

Britt Rusert on Left of Black: "Left of Black host Mark Anthony Neal is joined in the by scholar and author Britt Rusert, author of Fugitive Science: Empiricism and Freedom in Early African American Culture (NYU Press), which Which Alondra Nelson has called “Groundbreaking Interdisciplinary Scholarship.” Rusert is Associate Professor of African American Studies in … Continue reading VIDEO: Rusert on Fugitive Science, Black Freedom and Early African American Culture

BOOK: Taylor on Margaret Garner

Nikki M. Taylor, Driven toward Madness: The Fugitive Slave Margaret Garner and Tragedy on the Ohio (Athens: Ohio University Press, 2016). "Margaret Garner was the runaway slave who, when confronted with capture just outside of Cincinnati, slit the throat of her toddler daughter rather than have her face a life in slavery. Her story has … Continue reading BOOK: Taylor on Margaret Garner

BLOGROLL: Feimster on Ida B. Wells and the Lynching of Black Women – @NYTimes

Crystal Feimster writes: "At least 130 black women were murdered by lynch mobs from 1880 to 1930. This violence against black women has long been ignored or forgotten. Not anymore. Eliza Woods’s name is now engraved on one of the 800 weathered steel columns hanging from the ceiling of the National Memorial for Peace and … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Feimster on Ida B. Wells and the Lynching of Black Women – @NYTimes