BLOGROLL: Hunter on The Long History of Child-Snatching in the United States

Tera Hunter writes: "Most Americans are shocked by the increasingly frequent scenes of wailing mothers and babies being torn apart by government officers at the Mexican border. The Trump administration has ratcheted up the separation of children from parents as a way to deter migrants from Central America. "Some critics denounce this practice as “un-American.” … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Hunter on The Long History of Child-Snatching in the United States

BLOGROLL: Dize on Locating Enslaved Black Wet Nurses in Francophone Literature

Nathan Dize writes: "In George Sand’s 1832 idealist novel, Indiana, the eponymous protagonist is raised alongside her sœur de lait or “milk sister” Noun in the French Indian Ocean colony of Île Bourbon (present day Réunion). A “milk sister” was the daughter of the often enslaved wet nurse, and under French slave laws, children of … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Dize on Locating Enslaved Black Wet Nurses in Francophone Literature

DIGITAL: The Runaway Slaves in Britain Project Launches Today

Just launched: "The Runaway Slaves in Eighteenth-Century Britain project has created a searchable database of well over eight hundred newspaper advertisements placed by masters and owners seeking the capture and return of enslaved and bound people who had escaped. Many were of African descent, though a small number were from the Indian sub-continent and a … Continue reading DIGITAL: The Runaway Slaves in Britain Project Launches Today

VIDEO: Martinique, Slavery, Reparations

Corinne Jean-Joseph, Maryse Duhamel (Mouvement international pour la Réparation), Guilhaume de Reynal, Eric Dédé (Tous Creole), Moise Odino (author, Corps Noirs, Tetes Républicaines), and Alexane Ozier-Lafontaine (Mouvement international pour la Réparation) discuss the history of slavery in Martinique and Caribbean and the movement for reparations in this episode. Watch: https://youtu.be/2KAbHK8XSoU H/T @JoeFWI on Twitter

BLOGROLL/ARTICLES: Sinha’s Editor’s Note for June 2018 Journal of the Civil War Era on Abolitionism

Manisha Sinha writes: "When Judy Giesberg asked me to guest edit a special issue on abolition and solicit essays that would showcase new directions in abolition studies, I welcomed the opportunity. For a field that has been ploughed thoroughly—from global syntheses of the transition from slavery to freedom in the western world by some of … Continue reading BLOGROLL/ARTICLES: Sinha’s Editor’s Note for June 2018 Journal of the Civil War Era on Abolitionism

EDITED: Rogers and Lesueur on Manumission and Slavery in Europe and the Americas

New edited volume by Dominique Rogers and Boris Lesueur, via Karthala: "L’affranchissement individuel au sein d’une société à esclaves ou esclavagiste informe sur des situations singulières ou exceptionnelles. Dans une perspective comparatiste, cet ouvrage examine les parcours originaux de ces affranchis entre le XIVe siècle et le début du XIXe siècle, et dans un vaste … Continue reading EDITED: Rogers and Lesueur on Manumission and Slavery in Europe and the Americas

BLOGROLL: Harris on Whitewashing History of the Founders

Leslie Harris writes: "Tonight, the George Washington Book Prize of $50,000 will be awarded to Kevin J. Hayes for his book “George Washington, a Life in Books,” one of seven finalists selected as “the past year’s best-written works on the nation’s founding era.” Although over four decades of research on the history of slavery, race … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Harris on Whitewashing History of the Founders

BLOGROLL: Greenwald and Rothman Argue New Orleans should acknowledge its lead role in the slave trade

Erin Greenwald and Joshua Rothman write: "Concerned that overcrowded, squalid, and disease-ridden slave pens and prisons were a public health threat, the New Orleans City Council in 1829 banned the lodging and public exposure of slaves for sale or hire within what were then city limits, now the French Quarter. That regulation effectively pushed slave … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Greenwald and Rothman Argue New Orleans should acknowledge its lead role in the slave trade

BLOGROLL: Hunter on “Some Did Choose to Return to Slavery Because They Chose Family Over Everything”

Tera Hunter writes: "It is 1857, and Kanye, a carpenter, has finally saved up enough money to buy his freedom from Massa West. Trouble is, he has to leave his wife, Kimba, and five children on the plantation until he can buy them out of slavery as well. "Kanye is free from the constant threat … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Hunter on “Some Did Choose to Return to Slavery Because They Chose Family Over Everything”