INTERVIEW: Mustakeem on “The Lost History of the Middle Passage”

Sowande' Mustakeem interviewed by P/S Mag: "Mustakeem, an assistant professor of African and African American Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, took that gap in knowledge as a challenge to fill in with as much detail as possible. In Slavery at Sea, Mustakeem begins with the kidnapping of Africans and their sale into slavery … Continue reading INTERVIEW: Mustakeem on “The Lost History of the Middle Passage”

BOOK: Clark-Pujara on the Dark Work of Slavery in Rhode Island

Christy Clark-Pujara, Dark Work: The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island. New York: NYU Press, 2016. via NYU Press: "Historians have written expansively about the slave economy and its vital role in early American economic life. In Dark Work, Christy Clark-Pujara tells the story of one state in particular whose role was outsized: Rhode Island. Like their northern … Continue reading BOOK: Clark-Pujara on the Dark Work of Slavery in Rhode Island

BOOK: Johnson on Slavery’s Metropolis 

Rashauna Johnson. Slavery's Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions. Oxford University Press, 2016. via Oxford University Press: "New Orleans is an iconic city, which was once located at the crossroads of early America and the Atlantic World. New Orleans became a major American metropolis as its slave population exploded; in … Continue reading BOOK: Johnson on Slavery’s Metropolis 

BOOK CHAPTER: Rogers and King on Women of Color in 18th Century Saint-Domingue

Dominique Rogers and Stewart King. “Housekeepers, Merchants, Rentières: Free Women of Color in the Port Cities of Saint-Domingue, 1750-1790.” In Women in Port: Gendering Communities, Economies, and Social Networks in Atlantic Port Cities, 1500-1800, edited by Douglas Catterall and Jody Campbell, 357–98. BRILL, 2012. via Brill:   "This chapter explores the economic roles of women … Continue reading BOOK CHAPTER: Rogers and King on Women of Color in 18th Century Saint-Domingue

Dunbar on Episode 1 of Roots: “The Shame Is Not Ours” | @ProcessHistory

Dunbar: "No matter how degrading the situation, the enslaved did not lack humanity, nor were they traumatized beyond dignity—a dated myth that is eviscerated in the first episode. Kinte is reminded of this during his horrific Atlantic crossing when a countryman declares, “The shame is not ours!” The blame of slavery is placed squarely on greed and white racism...."