ARTICLE: Ginzberg on Women’s History, Mainstreams and Cutting Edges

Lori D. Ginzberg, “Mainstreams and Cutting Edges.” Journal of the Early Republic 36, no. 2 (2016): 319–25. doi:10.1353/jer.2016.0020. Ginzberg writes: In Philadelphia, where I live, archeologists digging across the street from Independence Hall found long-buried rooms where George Washington kept his slaves, whom he had brought to the new nation’s capital from Virginia. What emerged after … Continue reading ARTICLE: Ginzberg on Women’s History, Mainstreams and Cutting Edges

ARTICLE: Morgan on Race and Gender in the History of the Early Republic

Jennifer L. Morgan, “Periodization Problems: Race and Gender in the History of the Early Republic.” Journal of the Early Republic 36, no. 2 (2016): 351–57. Morgan writes: "The invitation to participate in a roundtable discussion on the early republic produced some confusion—what did I know about the history of African American women in the early … Continue reading ARTICLE: Morgan on Race and Gender in the History of the Early Republic

Hudson on The Racist Dawn of Capitalism | Boston Review

Peter James Hudson reviews three recent history of slavery and capitalism texts to place them in conversation with radical black scholarship and political thought, past and present: "Jaurès’s vision of economic questions as the primary engine of social and political change, his linking of capitalism with modernity, his casting of elites as historical actors—all these … Continue reading Hudson on The Racist Dawn of Capitalism | Boston Review

Johnson on Black Diasporic Intellectual Production for @AAIHS

Johnson writes: "What do historians of the earlier period do when dealing with black diasporic subjects laboring and living in a world of ideas, philosophies, and cosmologies but largely without alphanumeric texts? Does this black intellectual production only start becoming intellectual history when texts written by people of African descent begin to appear? What new possibilities for intellectual work open when the enslaved and the period of slavery become central?"

BOOK: Fuentes on Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive

"Combining fragmentary sources with interdisciplinary methodologies that include black feminist theory and critical studies of history and slavery, Dispossessed Lives demonstrates how the construction of the archive marked enslaved women's bodies, in life and in death. By vividly recounting enslaved life through the experiences of individual women and illuminating their conditions of confinement through the legal, sexual, and representational power wielded by slave owners, colonial authorities, and the archive, Fuentes challenges the way we write histories of vulnerable and often invisible subjects."