ARTICLE: Pryor on the Etymology of ‘Nigger’ in the Antebellum North

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "Effect of John Brown's invasion at the South (Nov. 19, 1859)." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 22, 2016. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-fb9f-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. “Effect of John Brown’s invasion at the South (Nov. 19, 1859).” New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 22, 2016. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-fb9f-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Pryor, Elizabeth Stordeur. “The Etymology of Nigger: Resistance, Language, and the Politics of Freedom in the Antebellum North.” Journal of the Early Republic 36, no. 2 (2016): 203–45.

Abstract:

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Jackson and Ball Discuss Roots from the 1970s to Now | Interview with the Journal of the Civil War Era

RootsMiniSeriesReboot

Elizabeth Motich interviews Kellie Carter Jackson and Erica L. Ball on the TV mini-series Roots and the 2016 remake for the The Journal of Civil War Era :

“This week on Muster, Dr. Kellie Carter Jackson and Dr. Erica L. Ball, authors of the upcoming book, Reconsidering Roots: Race, Politics, and Memory (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2017) talk about history, slavery, and black genealogy in anticipation of The History Channel’s May 31st premiere of a four-part remake of Alex Haley’s 1977 classic series, Roots. After the first episode of Roots, stay tuned for The Roots of Our History, a documentary about the series.

What do you recall about the original 1977 Roots series?

Continue reading “Jackson and Ball Discuss Roots from the 1970s to Now | Interview with the Journal of the Civil War Era”

Bonner on Frederick Douglass’s Compressed, Expanding World | @AAIHS

Christopher Bonner writes:

“As Douglass saw it, technological development enhanced political work. Steamships brought news from Europe in as few as fifteen days, which struck him as an immediate kind of knowledge that allowed a localized movement to exert a broad and seemingly instant influence. “A revolution now cannot be confined to the place or the people where it may commence, but flashes with lightning speed from heart to heart, from land to land, till it has traversed the globe.” News of France’s revolution moved “like a bolt of living thunder,” and cast “a ray of hope” into the dark corners of “American slave pens” inspiring the oppressed to join a struggle against tyranny in its diverse manifestations. Maritime technology, electric wiring, and print culture gave France’s revolution that broad power. Douglass’s own commentary made the revolution an Atlantic phenomenon, as he framed it as an attack on American slaveholders. “Thank God for the event! Slavery cannot always reign.”

We are living in the world Douglass invoked, defined by instantaneous communication, uncontainable ideas, and the complicated power of technology…”

Read the rest: Frederick Douglass’s Compressed, Expanding World | AAIHS

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