PODCAST: Daut Interview on Tropics of Haiti 

Marlene Daut interviewed by Dan Livesay from the New Books in Caribbean Studies podcast: "Marlene Daut tackles the complicated intersection of history and literary legacy in her book Tropics of Haiti: Race and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865 (Liverpool University Press, 2015). She not only describes the immediate … Continue reading PODCAST: Daut Interview on Tropics of Haiti 

Sesay on Remembering Phillis Wheatley at @AAIHS

Chernoh Sesay Jr. on eighteenth-century poet Phillis Wheatley in history and memory: "After Wheatley’s death, black detractors have debated her significance at least since the late nineteenth century; however, the late twentieth-century emergence of Wheatley studies has evolved a debate about Wheatley that parallels, but also contrasts, mentions of her in broader public forums. The … Continue reading Sesay on Remembering Phillis Wheatley at @AAIHS

BOOK: Hendricks on Fannie Barrier Williams

Wanda A. Hendricks, Fannie Barrier Williams: Crossing the Borders of Region and Race. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2013. via University of Illinois Press: Born shortly before the Civil War, activist and reformer Fannie Barrier Williams (1855–1944) became one of the most prominent educated African American women of her generation. In this first biography of … Continue reading BOOK: Hendricks on Fannie Barrier Williams

BOOK: Foreman on Reading Black Women in the Nineteenth Century

Pier Gabrielle Foreman, Activist Sentiments: Reading Black Women in the Nineteenth Century. University of Illinois Press, 2009. via University of Illinois Press: Activist Sentiments takes as its subject women who in fewer than fifty years moved from near literary invisibility to prolific productivity. Grounded in primary research and paying close attention to the historical archive, this … Continue reading BOOK: Foreman on Reading Black Women in the Nineteenth Century

EDITED: Radcliffe, Scott, and Werner on Black Intellectuals in the Atlantic World

via U Penn Press: Anywhere But Here brings together new scholarship on the cross-cultural experiences of intellectuals of African descent since the eighteenth century. The book embraces historian Paul Gilroy's prominent thesis in The Black Atlantic and posits arguments beyond The Black Atlantic's traditional organization and symbolism. These essays expand categories and suggest patterns that … Continue reading EDITED: Radcliffe, Scott, and Werner on Black Intellectuals in the Atlantic World

Interview: The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others | The UCSB Current

H/T - The Repeating Islands - Andrea Estrada interviews Esther Lezra on her new book The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others (Routledge, 2014): “It was important to show that the representational patterns that we use today are inheritors of an early representational rhetoric that was intrinsically tied up with material violence and injustice endured by … Continue reading Interview: The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others | The UCSB Current

TEACHING: Baucom and DuBois Course Site for “The Black Atlantic”

  Duke University students are writing the "Black Atlantic" online courtesy of a course taught by Ian Baucom and Laurent DuBois. From the syllabus: "This seminar, open to advanced undergraduate students and graduate students in all disciplines, explores the history and literature of what has come to be known as “The Black Atlantic.” Our goal … Continue reading TEACHING: Baucom and DuBois Course Site for “The Black Atlantic”

BOOK: Carretta on Phillis Wheatley

Vincent Carretta. Phillis Wheatley: Biography of a Genius in Bondage. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2011. via University of Georgia Press: "With Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1773), Phillis Wheatley (1753?–1784) became the first English-speaking person of African descent to publish a book and only the second woman—of any race or background— to … Continue reading BOOK: Carretta on Phillis Wheatley

ARTICLE: Sanborn on Plagiarism in Clotel

Geoffrey Sanborn. “‘People Will Pay to Hear the Drama’: Plagiarism in Clotel.” African American Review 45, no. 1 (2012): 65–82. Excerpt: It is no secret that William Wells Brown did not write everything that appears under his name in Clotel; or, the President's Daughter, the first published novel by an African American. Since 1969, when … Continue reading ARTICLE: Sanborn on Plagiarism in Clotel