BLOGROLL: Hunter on The Long History of Child-Snatching in the United States

Tera Hunter writes: "Most Americans are shocked by the increasingly frequent scenes of wailing mothers and babies being torn apart by government officers at the Mexican border. The Trump administration has ratcheted up the separation of children from parents as a way to deter migrants from Central America. "Some critics denounce this practice as “un-American.” … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Hunter on The Long History of Child-Snatching in the United States

BLOGROLL: Hunter on “Some Did Choose to Return to Slavery Because They Chose Family Over Everything”

Tera Hunter writes: "It is 1857, and Kanye, a carpenter, has finally saved up enough money to buy his freedom from Massa West. Trouble is, he has to leave his wife, Kimba, and five children on the plantation until he can buy them out of slavery as well. "Kanye is free from the constant threat … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Hunter on “Some Did Choose to Return to Slavery Because They Chose Family Over Everything”

BOOK: Penningroth on Kinship and Slavery

Dylan C. Penningroth, The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2003). via UNC: "In The Claims of Kinfolk, Dylan Penningroth uncovers an extensive informal economy of property ownership among slaves and sheds new light on African American family and community life … Continue reading BOOK: Penningroth on Kinship and Slavery

A Storify: Tweets from #UnboundJHU held at JHU March 8-9, 2018

Click here for tweets from #unboundJHU held at Johns Hopkins University, March 8-9, 2018. This conference was sponsored by the Center for Africana Studies and co-organized by Katrina Bell McDonald, Tera Jordan, and Jessica Marie Johnson. For more: http://bit.ly/unboundjhu (Storify compiled by @jmjafrx) Featured Image: Tera Hunter, Professor of History at Princeton University and author … Continue reading A Storify: Tweets from #UnboundJHU held at JHU March 8-9, 2018

Sharpe on Kinship, Whiteness, and Slavery in @TheNewInquiry

Sharpe: "Symbols are important and a safety pin is not enough. A safety pin is a temporary fix for a rent in the fabric. One must be willing to say this is abhorrent. One must be willing to be more than uncomfortable. One must be willing to be on the outside. One must refuse to repair a familial rift on the bodies cast out as not kin."

BOOK: Mann on “Marrying Well” in Lagos

  Mann, Kristin. Marrying Well: Marriage, Status and Social Change among the Educated Elite in Colonial Lagos. Cambridge University Press, 1985. via Cambridge U Press: "This pioneering work investigates the history of marriage among the educated elite in colonial Lagos. It analyses the far-reaching economic, political and social changes that produced the elite and shaped … Continue reading BOOK: Mann on “Marrying Well” in Lagos

BOOK: Ipsen on the Daughters of the Trade on the Gold Coast

Pernille Ipsen, Daughters of the Trade: Atlantic Slavers and Interracial Marriage on the Gold Coast. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015. via Penn Press: "Severine Brock's first language was Ga, yet it was not surprising when, in 1842, she married Edward Carstensen. He was the last governor of Christiansborg, the fort that, in the eighteenth century, … Continue reading BOOK: Ipsen on the Daughters of the Trade on the Gold Coast

BOOK: Stevenson on Slave Family & Community in the U.S. South

African Diaspora, Ph.D. is revisiting scholarship that has shaped the study of people of African descent across time and place. Brenda E. Stevenson. Life in Black and White : Family and Community in the Slave South: Family and Community in the Slave South. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. From Oxford University Press: Life in Black … Continue reading BOOK: Stevenson on Slave Family & Community in the U.S. South