EDITED: Scully and Patton on Gender and Slave Emancipation in the Atlantic World

Cover_Paton_and_Scully

Pamela Scully and Diana Paton, eds. Gender and Slave Emancipation in the Atlantic World. Duke University Press, 2005.

via Duke U Press:

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BOOK CHAPTER: Rogers and King on Women of Color in 18th Century Saint-Domingue

Dominique Rogers and Stewart King. “Housekeepers, Merchants, Rentières: Free Women of Color in the Port Cities of Saint-Domingue, 1750-1790.” In Women in Port: Gendering Communities, Economies, and Social Networks in Atlantic Port Cities, 1500-1800, edited by Douglas Catterall and Jody Campbell, 357–98. BRILL, 2012.

via Brill:

Continue reading “BOOK CHAPTER: Rogers and King on Women of Color in 18th Century Saint-Domingue”

Ross Interview on The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case | WWNO

A Negro Policeman (1974.25.25.181) / Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

Michael Ross was interviewed by of  TriPod: NOLA at 300 on his book The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case: Race, Law, and Justice in the Reconstruction Era (Oxford, 2014):

Continue reading “Ross Interview on The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case | WWNO”

DIGITAL: Scuffalong – North Carolina Free People of Color

Apsilla (or Apsaline) “Appie” Ward Hagans | as shown on Scuffalong
Apsilla (or Apsaline) “Appie” Ward Hagans | as shown on Scuffalong | More here: https://scuffalong.com/2014/03/16/appie-ward-hagans/

Lisa Y. Henderson is a researcher — and descendant — of North Carolina’s free people of color. She runs a genealogy blog at http://www.scuffalong.com which features archival material on her work in history and genealogy:

Continue reading “DIGITAL: Scuffalong – North Carolina Free People of Color”

Rothman Remarks on Marguerite Thompson’s Petition for Freedom

Adam Rothman remarks on a freed woman of color’s petition for manumission, posted by the National Archives on June 30, 2015:

“…One aspect of Marguerite Thompson’s petition that drew my attention is the fact that she submitted her petition to the Judge Charles Peabody’s U.S. Provisional Court (USPC). This court was established by the United States after Union forces seized New Orleans in 1862. Legal scholar John Gordan writes that “the most legally dramatic of the Provisional Court’s activities was its granting of manumission petitions by slaveholders.” (See Gordan’s article, “New York Justice in Civil War Louisiana,” Judicial Notice 8, p. 20)

As Gordan reveals, one of those slaveholders who appealed to Judge Peabody to manumit his slaves was the lawyer Thomas Jefferson Durant, who later represented Rose Herera in her quest to recover her children.

Read the rest: Marguerite Thompson’s Petition | Beyond Freedom’s Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery.

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