EDITED: Scully and Patton on Gender and Slave Emancipation in the Atlantic World

Cover_Paton_and_Scully

Pamela Scully and Diana Paton, eds. Gender and Slave Emancipation in the Atlantic World. Duke University Press, 2005.

via Duke U Press:

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BOOK CHAPTER: Rogers and King on Women of Color in 18th Century Saint-Domingue

Dominique Rogers and Stewart King. “Housekeepers, Merchants, Rentières: Free Women of Color in the Port Cities of Saint-Domingue, 1750-1790.” In Women in Port: Gendering Communities, Economies, and Social Networks in Atlantic Port Cities, 1500-1800, edited by Douglas Catterall and Jody Campbell, 357–98. BRILL, 2012.

via Brill:

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Ross Interview on The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case | WWNO

A Negro Policeman (1974.25.25.181) / Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

Michael Ross was interviewed by of  TriPod: NOLA at 300 on his book The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case: Race, Law, and Justice in the Reconstruction Era (Oxford, 2014):

Continue reading “Ross Interview on The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case | WWNO”

DIGITAL: Scuffalong – North Carolina Free People of Color

Apsilla (or Apsaline) “Appie” Ward Hagans | as shown on Scuffalong
Apsilla (or Apsaline) “Appie” Ward Hagans | as shown on Scuffalong | More here: https://scuffalong.com/2014/03/16/appie-ward-hagans/

Lisa Y. Henderson is a researcher — and descendant — of North Carolina’s free people of color. She runs a genealogy blog at http://www.scuffalong.com which features archival material on her work in history and genealogy:

Continue reading “DIGITAL: Scuffalong – North Carolina Free People of Color”

BOOK: Nwankwo on Black Cosmopolitanism in the 19th Century

Nwankwo_Black_Cosmo_Cover
Nwankwo, Ifeoma Kiddoe. Black Cosmopolitanism: Racial Consciousness and Transnational Identity in the Nineteenth-Century Americas. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005.

via UPenn Press:

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Daut on “Genocidal Imaginings” in the Era of the Haitian Revolution | Age of Revolutions

Marlene L. Daut writes:

Continue reading “Daut on “Genocidal Imaginings” in the Era of the Haitian Revolution | Age of Revolutions”

Rothman Remarks on Marguerite Thompson’s Petition for Freedom

Adam Rothman remarks on a freed woman of color’s petition for manumission, posted by the National Archives on June 30, 2015:

“…One aspect of Marguerite Thompson’s petition that drew my attention is the fact that she submitted her petition to the Judge Charles Peabody’s U.S. Provisional Court (USPC). This court was established by the United States after Union forces seized New Orleans in 1862. Legal scholar John Gordan writes that “the most legally dramatic of the Provisional Court’s activities was its granting of manumission petitions by slaveholders.” (See Gordan’s article, “New York Justice in Civil War Louisiana,” Judicial Notice 8, p. 20)

As Gordan reveals, one of those slaveholders who appealed to Judge Peabody to manumit his slaves was the lawyer Thomas Jefferson Durant, who later represented Rose Herera in her quest to recover her children.

Read the rest: Marguerite Thompson’s Petition | Beyond Freedom’s Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery.

BOOK: Scott and Hébrard on Rosalie de Nación Poulard

Scott, Rebecca J, and Jean M Hébrard. Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2012.

via Harvard University Press:

“Around 1785, a woman was taken from her home in Senegambia and sent to Saint-Domingue in the Caribbean. Those who enslaved her there named her Rosalie. Her later efforts to escape slavery were the beginning of a family’s quest, across five generations and three continents, for lives of dignity and equality. Freedom Papers sets the saga of Rosalie and her descendants against the background of three great antiracist struggles of the nineteenth century: the Haitian Revolution, the French Revolution of 1848, and the Civil War and Reconstruction in the United States.

“Freed during the Haitian Revolution, Rosalie and her daughter Elisabeth fled to Cuba in 1803. A few years later, Elisabeth departed for New Orleans, where she married a carpenter, Jacques Tinchant. In the 1830s, with tension rising against free persons of color, they left for France. Subsequent generations of Tinchants fought in the Union Army, argued for equal rights at Louisiana’s state constitutional convention, and created a transatlantic tobacco network that turned their Creole past into a commercial asset. Yet the fragility of freedom and security became clear when, a century later, Rosalie’s great-great-granddaughter Marie-José was arrested by Nazi forces occupying Belgium.

“Freedom Papers follows the Tinchants as each generation tries to use the power and legitimacy of documents to help secure freedom and respect. The strategies they used to overcome the constraints of slavery, war, and colonialism suggest the contours of the lives of people of color across the Atlantic world during this turbulent epoch.”