BLOGROLL: “We Can Never Tell the Entire Story of Slavery: In Conversation” An Interview with M. NourbeSe Philip

From 2014, Paul Watkins interviews M. NourbeSe Philip on history, memory, slavery, and the archive: "M. NourbeSe Philip’s Zong! riffs on the legal document from the King’s Bench hearing. The legal account is one version of what happened, a happening couched in official language that Philip gradually dislodges through the poetic excavation and untelling of … Continue reading BLOGROLL: “We Can Never Tell the Entire Story of Slavery: In Conversation” An Interview with M. NourbeSe Philip

NEWS: A Statement On Race and Medieval Studies 

A Collective of Medievalists of Color issues a statement on racism in the profession and in their field: "We, the Medievalists of Color, need our colleagues to understand the systemic racism of which we speak and the role it has continued to play in our field’s constitution and practices; to educate themselves in the critical … Continue reading NEWS: A Statement On Race and Medieval Studies 

BOOK: Semley on Citizenship in the French Atlantic

 Lorelle Semley, To Be Free and French: Citizenship in France’s Atlantic Empire. Cambridge University Press, 2017. via Cambridge U Press: The Haitian Revolution may have galvanized subjects of French empire in the Americas and Africa struggling to define freedom and 'Frenchness' for themselves, but Lorelle Semley reveals that this event was just one moment in a … Continue reading BOOK: Semley on Citizenship in the French Atlantic

BOOK: Cobb on Remaking Black Visuality in the Early Nineteenth Century | Books | NYU Press

Jasmine Nichole Cobb, Picture Freedom: Remaking Black Visuality in the Early Nineteenth Century. New York: NYU Press, 2015. via NYU Press: "In the decades leading up to the end of U.S. slavery, many free Blacks sat for daguerreotypes decorated in fine garments to document their self-possession. People pictured in these early photographs used portraiture to seize … Continue reading BOOK: Cobb on Remaking Black Visuality in the Early Nineteenth Century | Books | NYU Press

Dunbar on Episode 4 of Roots: “The Ones I’m Missing” | @ProcessHistory

Dunbar: " In an interesting departure from the original miniseries, we arrive in Hampshire in 1849 to find an older Chicken George, still immersed in the sport of cockfighting. Sold to an Englishman to cover a gambling debt, George has been stripped from his family, enduring the same pain as his mother and grandfather had before him."

DIGITAL: Runaway Slaves in Britain

Runaway Slaves in Britain is led by Simon P. Newman, Stephen Mullen, and Nelson Mundell: Historians know relatively little about the enslaved people who lived, worked and died in eighteenth century Britain. This project will create a database of searchable information about those who sought to escape their bondage. Not all of the the people … Continue reading DIGITAL: Runaway Slaves in Britain

EDITED: Bryant, O’Toole, and Vinson on Africans to Spanish America

Sherwin K. Bryant, Rachel Sarah O’Toole, and Ben Vinson, eds. Africans to Spanish America: Expanding the Diaspora. University of Illinois Press, 2014. via University of Illinois Press: Africans to Spanish America expands the Diaspora framework that has shaped much of the recent scholarship on Africans in the Americas to include Mexico, Peru, Ecuador, and Cuba, … Continue reading EDITED: Bryant, O’Toole, and Vinson on Africans to Spanish America

EDITED: Radcliffe, Scott, and Werner on Black Intellectuals in the Atlantic World

via U Penn Press: Anywhere But Here brings together new scholarship on the cross-cultural experiences of intellectuals of African descent since the eighteenth century. The book embraces historian Paul Gilroy's prominent thesis in The Black Atlantic and posits arguments beyond The Black Atlantic's traditional organization and symbolism. These essays expand categories and suggest patterns that … Continue reading EDITED: Radcliffe, Scott, and Werner on Black Intellectuals in the Atlantic World