ARTICLE: Everill on “All the baubles that they needed”: “Industriousness” and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée

Bronwen Everill, “‘All the Baubles That They Needed’: ‘Industriousness’ and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée,” Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 15, no. 4 (November 1, 2017): 714–39.

 

Abstract:

“Atlantic port cities were sites of commercial, consumer, and industrious revolutions in the eighteenth century. This essay argues that accounts of the Atlantic consumer and industrious revolutions need to include African port cities because they were an important market for consumer goods and services. The Senegambian cities of Saint-Louis and Gorée were port cities involved in the consumption of Atlantic and global goods, as well as in the provision of services for ships involved in trade, and especially the slave trade. They had a class of women involved in the economic transformation of the cities, who help illustrate the role of consumerism, as well as the possibilities for accumulation created by the institution of domestic urban slavery. It is useful to look at African port cities because their experiences of urban slavery can help us think critically about what is meant by the industrious household and about how women in different Atlantic contexts were able to accumulate and use invested capital in varying ways.”

Read: Project MUSE – “All the baubles that they needed”: “Industriousness” and Slavery in Saint-Louis and Gorée

SOURCE: Petition signed by John Cuffe and Paul Cuffe regarding taxation | @NMAAHC

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BOOK: Berry on Slavery, Value, and a “Pound of Flesh”

Daina Ramey Berry, The Price for Their Pound of Flesh: The Value of the Enslaved, from Womb to Grave, in the Building of a Nation. Boston: Beacon Press, 2017.

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ARTICLE: Green on Letters from a Fancy Girl

Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Gift of Mrs. W. Fitch Ingersoll [58.4] Slave Market, ca. 1850-1860. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 39 1/2 inches. as seen at Schomburg In Motion http://www.inmotionaame.org/gallery/detail.cfm;jsessionid=f8301904881471088718788?migration=3&topic=99&id=341998&type=image&metadata=show&page=2&bhcp=1
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Gift of Mrs. W. Fitch Ingersoll [58.4]
Slave Market, ca. 1850-1860. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 39 1/2 inches. as seen at Schomburg Research Center Online Exhibit In Motion: The African American Migration Experience (click for more)
Sharony Green,“‘Mr Ballard, I Am Compelled to Write Again’: Beyond Bedrooms and Brothels, a Fancy Girl Speaks.” Black Women, Gender & Families 5, no. 1 (2011).

Green writes:

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BOOK: Beckles on Slavery and Reparations in the British Caribbean

Cover_Beckles_Reparations_Black_Debt

Hilary McD. Beckles, Britain’s Black Debt: Reparations for Slavery and Native Genocide. Kingston, Jamaica: Univ of West Indies Pr, 2013.

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BOOK: Jones on The Métis of Senegal

Metis Cover

Hilary Jones. The Métis of Senegal: Urban Life and Politics in French West Africa. Indiana University Press, 2013.

via Indiana University Press:

The Métis of Senegal is a history of politics and society among an influential group of mixed-race people who settled in coastal Africa under French colonialism. Hilary Jones describes how the métis carved out a niche as middleman traders for European merchants. As the colonial presence spread, the métis entered into politics and began to assert their position as local elites and power brokers against French rule. Many of the descendants of these traders continue to wield influence in contemporary Senegal. Jones’s nuanced portrait of métis ascendency examines the influence of family connections, marriage negotiations, and inheritance laws from both male and female perspectives.