ARTICLE/JOURNAL/DIGITAL: Social Text Special Issue on Slavery, Freedom, and the Archive

Special Issue of Social Text (33:4, 2015) on "The Question of Recovery: Slavery, Freedom, and the Archive," including a roundtable on slavery, mapping, and the digital humanities. Guest edited by Laura Helton, Justin Leroy, Max A. Mishler, Samantha Seeley, and Shauna Sweeney  Articles Helton, Laura, Justin Leroy, Max A. Mishler, Samantha Seeley, and Shauna Sweeney. … Continue reading ARTICLE/JOURNAL/DIGITAL: Social Text Special Issue on Slavery, Freedom, and the Archive

DIGITAL: Rudisell of the Colored Conventions Project on Copyright and Doing Digital Black History

Carol A. Rudisell, librarian at the University of Delaware Library, writes about working with the Colored Conventions Project (previously featured at #ADPhD & Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog): "During the past three years I’ve had the opportunity of working collaboratively with the Colored Conventions Project (CCP), a dedicated team of scholars, students, and library professionals whose … Continue reading DIGITAL: Rudisell of the Colored Conventions Project on Copyright and Doing Digital Black History

DIGITAL: Freedom on the Move and Slave Resistance in New Orleans

Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog (Archived)

“This interactive Google map shows original newspaper ads for fugitive slaves and contemporary locations of identified sites. Click on the name of a fugitive from the list or on a map point to reveal the ad and corresponding site. Green markers indicate points of flight; red markers, points of refuge.

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Bonner on Frederick Douglass’s Compressed, Expanding World | @AAIHS

Christopher Bonner writes: "As Douglass saw it, technological development enhanced political work. Steamships brought news from Europe in as few as fifteen days, which struck him as an immediate kind of knowledge that allowed a localized movement to exert a broad and seemingly instant influence. “A revolution now cannot be confined to the place or … Continue reading Bonner on Frederick Douglass’s Compressed, Expanding World | @AAIHS

DIGITAL/NEWS: Slave Trade Database to Expand, Update Website | The Emory Wheel

The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, an online database providing information about slaves and slave trading voyages, will soon expand to include information about intra-American slave trade as well as have a new accessibility. The online database is supervised by two Emory faculty members in partnership with international scholars. The project investigators — David Eltis, Robert… … Continue reading DIGITAL/NEWS: Slave Trade Database to Expand, Update Website | The Emory Wheel

DIGITAL: “Lost Friends” Database: Former Slaves Searching for Kin

Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog (Archived)

Two dollars in 1880 bought a yearlong subscription to the Southwestern Christian Advocate, a newspaper published in New Orleans by the Methodist Book Concern and distributed to nearly five hundred preachers, eight hundred post offices, and more than four thousand subscribers in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Arkansas. The “Lost Friends” column, which ran from the paper’s 1877 inception well into the first decade of the twentieth century, featured messages from individuals searching for loved ones lost in slavery.

This searchable database provides access to more than 330 advertisements that appeared in the Southwestern Christian Advocate between November 1879 and December 1880. Digital reproductions of the Lost Friends ads are courtesy of Hill Memorial Library, Louisiana State University Libraries.

Explore the database: Lost Friends Exhibition – The Historic New Orleans Collection.

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DIGITAL: Richmond’s Slave District Recreated in 3D

Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog (Archived)

Richmond’s Slave District Recreated in 3D | Community Idea Stations:

“Researchers at the University of Richmond have created a 3D map of
the city’s slave district in 1853. Part of the Library of Virginia’s “To
Be Sold” exhibit, the map traces the steps of a British artist whose
experience in Richmond led to abolitionist sketches, essays and
paintings. Catherine Komp has more for Virginia Currents.

Learn More:University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab is giving a lecture on the 3D Slave District map Tuesday April 7th, Noon-1:00 p.m.,
at the Library of Virginia. They’ll also be sharing an animated map of
the evacuation fires as part of the Capitol Square pop-up museum for the
150th Fall of Richmond anniversary events.”

via Richmond’s Slave District Recreated in 3D | Community Idea Stations (Audio Available)

(H/T Brandon Locke for the link via Twitter!)

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TALK: The Race for Digitality | Roopika Risam

At African Diaspora 2.0, Roopika Risam of #DHPoco: Postcolonial Digital Humanities discussed the tension between digital humanities and African diaspora studies. An excerpt: "...In the race for digitality, we find ourselves struggling to understand the relationship between our deep investments in discourses like intersectional feminism or critical race theory and digital humanities. The burden of … Continue reading TALK: The Race for Digitality | Roopika Risam

SOURCE: Controversial Literature in The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society | Readex

"The September release of The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922, contains many documents categorized as “controversial literature.” This bibliographical term describes works that argue against or express opposition to individual religious and monastic orders, individual religions, individual Christian denominations, and sacred works. Unsurprisingly, much of the controversy in the following documents surrounds Biblical interpretations of the … Continue reading SOURCE: Controversial Literature in The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society | Readex