BOOK: Beckles on Slavery and Reparations in the British Caribbean

Cover_Beckles_Reparations_Black_Debt

Hilary McD. Beckles, Britain’s Black Debt: Reparations for Slavery and Native Genocide. Kingston, Jamaica: Univ of West Indies Pr, 2013.

via University of the West Indies Press:

Continue reading “BOOK: Beckles on Slavery and Reparations in the British Caribbean”

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ARTICLES: Material Cultures of Slavery in British Caribbean

“French Set-Girls,” in  Isaac Mendes Belisario, Sketches of character, in illustration of the habits, occupation, and costume of the Negro population, in the island of Jamaica: drawn after nature, and in lithography (Kingston, Jamaica: published by the artist, at his residence, 1837-1838). http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/Slavery/detailsKeyword.php?keyword=jamaica&recordCount=100&theRecord=1

Special Issue: Material Cultures of Slavery and Abolition in the British Caribbean

Edited by Christer Petley and Stephan Lenik

Stephan Lenik and Christer Petley, ‘Introduction: The Material Cultures of Slavery and Abolition in the British Caribbean’

Section I – Planters, workers and the development of plantation space

1. Douglas V. Armstrong and Matthew C. Reilly, ‘The Archaeology of Settler Farms and Early Plantation Life in Seventeenth-Century Barbados’

2. Stephanie Bergman and Frederick H. Smith, ‘Blurring Disciplinary Boundaries: The Material Culture of Improvement during the Age of Abolition in Barbados’

3. Christer Petley, ‘Plantations and Homes: The Material Culture of the Early Nineteenth-Century Jamaican Elite’

Section II – Material inequalities and practices inside enslaved communities

4. Justin Roberts, ‘The “Better Sort” and the “Poorer Sort”: Wealth Inequalities, Family Formation and the Economy of Energy on British Caribbean Sugar Plantations, 1750-1800’

5. James A. Delle and Kristen R. Fellows, ‘Death and Burial at Marshall’s Pen, a Jamaican Coffee Plantation, 1814-1839: Examining the End of Life at the End of Slavery’

Section III – The uses and meanings of material culture between slavery and freedom

6. Natalie Zacek and Laurence Brown, ‘Unsettled Houses: The Material Culture of the Missionary Project in Jamaica in the Era of Emancipation’

7. Stephan Lenik, ‘Plantation Labourer Rebellions, Material Culture, and Events: Historical Archaeology at Geneva Estate, Grand Bay, Commonwealth of Dominica’

B.W. Higman, ‘Afterword: Survival and Silence in the Material Record of Slavery and Abolition’

Featured Image Credit: “French Set-Girls,” in  Isaac Mendes Belisario, Sketches of character, in illustration of the habits, occupation, and costume of the Negro population, in the island of Jamaica: drawn after nature, and in lithography (Kingston, Jamaica: published by the artist, at his residence, 1837-1838). http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/Slavery/detailsKeyword.php?keyword=jamaica&recordCount=100&theRecord=1

BOOK: Dobie on Images of Slavery in 18c French Culture

Madeleine Dobie. Trading Places: Colonization and Slavery in Eighteenth-Century French Culture. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2010.

“In Trading Places, Madeleine Dobie explores the place of the colonial world in the culture of the French Enlightenment. She shows that until a turning point in the late 1760s questions of colonization and slavery occupied a very marginal position in literature, philosophy, and material and visual culture. In an exploration of the causes and modalities of this silence, Dobie traces the displacement of colonial questions onto two more familiar—and less ethically challenging—aspects of Enlightenment thought: exoticization of the Orient and fascination with indigenous Amerindian cultures.

Expanding the critical analysis of the cultural imprint of colonization to encompass commodities as well as texts, Dobie considers how tropical raw materials were integrated into French material culture. In an original exploration of the textile and furniture industries Dobie considers consumer goods both as sites of representation and as vestiges of the labor of the enslaved. Turning to the closing decades of the eighteenth century, Dobie considers how silence evolved into discourse. She argues that sustained examination of the colonial order was made possible by the rise of economic liberalism, which attacked the prevailing mercantilist doctrine and formulated new perspectives on agriculture, labor (including slavery), commerce, and global markets. Questioning recent accounts of late Enlightenment “anticolonialism,” she shows that late eighteenth-century French philosophers opposed slavery while advocating the expansion of a “liberalized” colonial order. Innovative and interdisciplinary, Trading Places combines literary and historical analysis with new research into political economy and material culture.”

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