AUDIO: LeFlouria on How the convict labor of Black women built the new South

Historian Talitha LeFlouria examines the incarcerated labor of Black women in Reconstruction-era Georgia - work that rebuilt the South's infrastructure and industrial economy under brutal conditions, enabled by the social language and legal mechanisms around Black lives that persist in America's modern mass incarceration complex.   Source: This Is Hell! | Everywhere yet nowhere: How … Continue reading AUDIO: LeFlouria on How the convict labor of Black women built the new South

BLOGROLL: Edwards on Why Confederate statues fail to represent Southern history | TheHill

Laura Edwards writes: "The South did not exist as “the South” until the creation of the Confederacy. It was a diverse region, with a long and complicated history. And during the Civil War, not all Confederates were Southerners and not all Southerners were Confederates. "Black Southerners provide the most obvious example. Barred from participating in … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Edwards on Why Confederate statues fail to represent Southern history | TheHill

NEWS: AHA Statement on Confederate Monuments (August 2017) | AHA

History comprises both facts and interpretations of those facts. To remove a monument, or to change the name of a school or street, is not to erase history, but rather to alter or call attention to a previous interpretation of history. A monument is not history itself; a monument commemorates an aspect of history, representing a moment in the past when a public or private decision defined who would be honored in a community’s public spaces...

DIGITAL: Mapping The Freedmen’s Bureau

Created by Angela Walton-Raji and Toni Carrier: "Mapping the Freedman’s Bureau is devoted to helping researchers put their ancestors back on the historical landscape where they lived. During those critical years after the Civil War, many once enslaved people found themselves in a dangerous situation. Many had freed themselves and taken refuge after making their … Continue reading DIGITAL: Mapping The Freedmen’s Bureau

BLOGROLL: Handley-Cousins on Falling Out of Love with the Civil War | @NursingClio

We love the Civil War so much that when we are presented with the truth of what those monuments mean, we refuse to accept that what we love was actually a violent struggle in which the inhumanity of Black Americans was at the center. Facing the real history of these monuments means confronting the fact that loving Robert E. Lee or Stonewall Jackson means loving white supremacy — that’s why those conversations with our friends and family members become bizarrely personal and painful. We don’t want to give up what we love. We do not want to admit that in some sense, those of us who love this war are complicit...

AUDIO: Never Monument to Hurt You by The Rise of Charm City | @SoundCloud

In the middle of an August night, the City of Baltimore removed four Confederate monuments from parks and public squares. A few people bore witness, and almost everyone in town had an opinion. In this bonus mini-episode, we talk to a few of them, not just about the statues but also about the quiet removal … Continue reading AUDIO: Never Monument to Hurt You by The Rise of Charm City | @SoundCloud

VIDEO: The Take Em Down Nola Story

Take Em Down NOLA, a multi-racial, multi-generational coalition of organizers, artists, and activists committed to the removal of ALL symbols to White Supremacy in the city of New Orleans as a necessary part of the greater push for social and economic justice in the city. In May of 2017, the group began posting videos documenting … Continue reading VIDEO: The Take Em Down Nola Story

BLOGROLL: Twenty Negro or Overseer Law?: Ideas for the Classroom – The Journal of the Civil War Era

John Sacher discusses how to use the "Twenty Negro" exemption in the classroom when teaching about the U.S. Civil War: "Passed in October 1862, this amendment to the April 1862 conscription law allowed planters (those who owned twenty or more slaves) an exemption for someone to oversee their slaves. These historians often quote Mississippi Senator … Continue reading BLOGROLL: Twenty Negro or Overseer Law?: Ideas for the Classroom – The Journal of the Civil War Era