20 Years of the Black Atlantic at Africa in Words: Art, Politics & Intellectual Production

Gilroy The Black Atlantic

Africa in Words is running a series of posts on Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, in celebration of the 20th anniversary of its release. Click here to read the first post of the series and here to read the second.

Bruno Muniz continues the series with a post on art and politics in Gilroy’s ‘black Atlantic:’

“The artists and intellectuals considered by Gilroy are political beings, but not necessarily and exclusively through spoken, sung or written words. Even though there is not enough space to explore all the implications of Gilroy’s work in integrating aesthetics, politics and culture, I hope this text accomplished at least to synthesize some of his ideas that helped me a lot to think about my academic practices. The ideas being presented here are also a path to escape from the simplistic question of whether funk represents more “miscegenation” or blackness. Both options bring assumptions that cannot be ignored….”

Read the rest: Culture, politics and intellectual practice through Gilroy’s “The Black Atlantic” | Africa in Words http://bit.ly/12gFQT7

20 Years of the Black Atlantic at Africa in Words: Samba, Jazz, Brazil

Gilroy The Black Atlantic

Africa in Words is running a series of posts on Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, in celebration of the 20th anniversary of its release. Click here to read the first post of the series and here to read the third.

Gabriel Improta continues with a post on the music of Brazil and the role culture plays in Gilroy’s conception of ‘black Atlantic:’

When looking at the cultural practices of the black Atlantic, Gilroy called for focusing on music. He criticised the obsession with the body of slaves and their descendants;  the result of a dichotomous (and Western) approach to the relation between body and mind. This dichotomy, he explains, leads to the understanding of black music (and dance) as the lowest form of art because it would be solely physical and, therefore, never intellectual. Often, music — and especially black music — is understood as a “spontaneous” or “natural” manifestation, produced by an innate talent linked to race or nationality.

Read the rest: Gilroy’s Black Atlantic: Samba, Jazz and Sambajazz in Brazil and the Black Atlantic. « Africa in Words http://bit.ly/10IuVO2

20 Years of the Black Atlantic at Africa in Words

Gilroy The Black Atlantic

Africa in Words is running a series of posts on Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, in celebration of the 20th anniversary of its releaseClick here to read the second post of the series and here to read the third.

Nara Improta begins with a review of the famous work:

“This year, Gilroy’s Black Atlantic completed twenty years of its publication. This book has been used by many scholars in history, anthropology, literature and sociology, and became very influential. It also provoked many criticisms. This is the first of a series of posts about the uses of Black Atlantic in recent scholarly production. Africa in Words invited academics to write about how they used Gilroy’s theories and concepts in their own work.

In this post I will (try to) explain some aspects of the concept of Black Atlantic, as proposed by Gilroy in his book. This is a big task since, throughout the book; the concept seems to acquire a very complex meaning. Some authors even think that Gilroy himself uses Black Atlantic with different definitions….”

Read the rest.

(H/T NeoGriot)

Ted Fellow Cesar Harada Blogs 1811 Louisiana Slave Revolt, Gulf Coast Oil Spill, Environment

In 1811 white landlords were forcing black slaves to manipulate fatal toxic, such as the one required in the fabrication of Indigo (pigment). Today, the swamps owned by the former slaves children has been bought by major energy companies at an unfair price to host multi-millions polluting facilities. The descents of the slaves still live on the “fence lines” of these industries. The inhabitants suffer severe health issues (cancers, asthma) and the fancy playgrounds built by corporations have no children playing.

Read the rest at Contemporary Slavery – TED Fellows.

Slavery and Law at Legal History Blog

The Legal History blog (founded by Mary L. Dudziak, the Judge Edward J. and Ruey L. Guirado Professor of Law, History and Political Science at the University of Southern California Law School) has several articles on U.S. slavery and the law:

Guest contributor Salley Greene’s three part series presenting new archival evidence concerning State v. Mann (1830), the North Carolina Supreme Court case which ruled that slaveowners had absolute authority over their slaves and could not be found guilty of committing violence against them. (EDIT: The series actually has four parts.)

Also, an abstract for Gerald Leonard’s forthcoming essay reconsidering the law and politics of the  Dred Scott case.

(Click the Image for Credit and useful teaching resources at pbs.org)

History and Politics: Black Confederates in the Civil War

“Our Colored Troops,” Harper’s Weekly, February 28, 1863. (Source: New York Public Library/Digital NYPL)

The History Carnival hosted at Cliopatria has two articles on the myth and reality of black soldiers who served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War.

A snip from Applying UFOlogy Techniques to the Search for Black Confederates:

On the other hand the skeptic summarizes his view at the very tail end of the clip:  “Look, this is just like every other UFO case we’ve investigated.  There’s always a witness – we can’t confirm the testimony; information that we can’t find strict evidence for;  there’s always a door closed, there’s always an underground facility….”

I just see too many similarities in the logic applied here, on both sides, regarding the issue of Black Confederates.  How often are we presented with something purported to be “evidence” that clearly is not what the presenter claims?  Or is taken completely out of context to make it seem what it isn’t?

Read both and other posts from the carnival here.