ARTICLE: Davidson on Ex-Slave Reparations in the Early 20th Century United States

James M. Davidson, “Encountering the Ex-Slave Reparations Movement from the Grave:  The National Industrial Council and National Liberty Party, 1901-1907.” Journal of African American History 97, no. 1–2 (Winter-Spring 2012): 13–38.
First Paragraph:
“The call for reparations for those who suffered under the blight of slavery and its aftermath is one increasingly heard today, but this call is hardly a new one.  Rather, the notion of reparations, or in earlier terms, ex-slave pensions, was something argued for and against throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  While the discipline of history traditionally records this story, archaeology can help fill in the gaps and illuminate this past in a unique way.  One vital link to this past is contained in historic cemeteries, where the mortal remains of those who lived and died under slavery and the first decades after emancipation now lie.”
This special issue of the Journal of African-American History, “African-Americans and Movements for Reparations: Past, Present, and Future (Dedicated to the Scholarly Legacy of Dr. Ronald W. Walters),” includes an introduction by V. P. Franklin, articles by Elaine Allen Lechtreck, Keith A. Dye, Emma T. Lucas-Darby, Ronald W. Walters, and review essays by Pero Gaglo Dagbovie, Clyde C. Robertson.
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JAAH 93:4: Special Issue on the End of the Slave Trade

The Journal of African American History volume 93:4 is a special issue commemorating the bicentennial of the outlawing of the Atlantic slave trade by the United States.

First paragraph steal from the introduction by journal editor and Distinguished Professor of History at the University of California, Riverside V. P. Franklin:

“The year 2008 marks the bicentennial of the end of legal participation of United States citizens in the transatlantic slave trade. Under the terms of compromises that were made to gain southem slaveholders’ support for the ratification of the U.S. Constitution in 1789, members of the Congress were banned from prohibiting the importation of enslaved Africans into the United States until 1808. In light of the successful slave revolt on Saint Domingue leading to the birth of Haiti, the second republic in the New World (1791-1804); Gabriel Prosser’s unsuccessful slave insurrection in Virginia in 1800; and the

decision by the members of Parliametit in 1807 to outlaw British participation in the transatlantic slave trade, the Congress voted to ban the importation of enslaved Africans into the United States as of 1 January 1808.”

Articles:

INTRODUCTION: ENDING THE TRANSATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE: BICENTENNIAL RESEARCH, REFLECTIONS, AND COMMEMORATIONS.
Franklin, V. P.

“I NEVER HAVE SUCH A SICKLY SHIP BEFORE”: DIET, DISEASE, AND MORTALITY IN 18TH-CENTURY ATLANTIC SLAVING VOYAGES
Mustakeem, Sowande’

RESISTANCE AND COLLABORATION: POLITICAL STRATEGIES WITHIN THE AFRO-CAROLINIAN SLAVE COMMUNITY, 1700-1750
Kyles, Perry L.

THE SLAVING BRIG HENRIQUETA AND HER EVIL SISTERS: A CASE STUDY IN THE 19th-CENTURY ILLEGAL SLAVE TRADE TO BRAZIL
Tinnie, Dinizulu Gene

REFLECTIONS ON THE BICENTENNIAL OF THE ABOLITION OF THE BRITISH SLAVE TRADE
Kerr-Ritchie, J. R.

CROSS-CULTURAL COMMEMORATION: FROM THE SLAVE TRADE ABOLITION BICENTENNIAL TO CARNIVAL MESSIAH
Franklin, V. P.

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