BOOK: Camp on Everyday Resistance in the U.S. South

Stephanie M. H. Camp. Closer to Freedom: Enslaved Women and Everyday Resistance in the Plantation South. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2004. From UNC Press: Recent scholarship on slavery has explored the lives of enslaved people beyond the watchful eye of their masters. Building on this work and the study of space, social … Continue reading BOOK: Camp on Everyday Resistance in the U.S. South

Stephanie M. H. Camp (1967-2014)

University of Washington history professor Stephanie M. H. Camp passed away on April 2nd. Camp was the author of Closer to Freedom: Enslaved Women and Everyday Resistance in the Plantation South (University of North Carolina Press, 2004, also profiled on #ADPhD here). Camp also edited, with Edward Baptist, New Studies in the History of Slavery … Continue reading Stephanie M. H. Camp (1967-2014)

Readings in Black Geographies

Carl H. Nightingale.  “Before Race Mattered: Geographies of the Color Line in Early Colonial Madras and New York.” The American Historical Review 113, no. 1 (February 1, 2008): 48-71. First paragraph: By the 1710s, British authorities at both Madras, India, and New York City had made, by fits and starts, more than a half-century of … Continue reading Readings in Black Geographies

Women of Color and Slavery in the United States

In the summer of 2007, the Journal of Women's History (19:2) published a roundtable on "The History of Women and Slavery: Considering the Impact of Ar'n't I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South on the Twentieth Anniversary of Its Publication." According to the "Introduction" by Jennifer L. Morgan, the roundtable was originally a … Continue reading Women of Color and Slavery in the United States