BLOGROLL: Hartman on Archives and Writing

Saidiya Hartman interviewed on archives, writing, and black death:
Continue reading “BLOGROLL: Hartman on Archives and Writing”

Advertisements

VIDEO/CONF: Scenes at 20 – Inspirations, Riffs, and Reverberations

This symposium celebrates the 20th anniversary of Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America and its impact on studies of Black lives in the past, present, and future. Please join us as we consider the work’s impact within its intergenerational intellectual context and theorize new possibilities for Black life and Black freedom in these perilous times.

 

For more on the conference: http://www.scenesat20.com/
Footage from the panels is available and livestreams are available for each day.
via YouTube:

Continue reading “VIDEO/CONF: Scenes at 20 – Inspirations, Riffs, and Reverberations”

ARTICLE: Hartman on Black Women’s Labors

HW9-760
“Negro Quarters” in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine (1853), vol. 9, p. 753. (Copy in Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library) as shown on http://www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.
Saidiya Hartman, “The Belly of the World: A Note on Black Women’s Labors.” Souls 18, no. 1 (2016): 166-173.
First paragraph:

Continue reading “ARTICLE: Hartman on Black Women’s Labors”

VIDEO: The Lapidus Center Presents Slavery and Memory x Whitney Plantation

This enlightening discussion will focus on memory, commemorations, and legacies of the slave trade and slavery, and feature panelists John Cummings and Ibrahima Seck of the Whitney Plantation and Museum; Columbia University professor Saidiya Hartman; architect Rodney Leon; and University of Pennsylvania professor Salamishah Tillett.

This program is brought to you by the Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery.@SchomburgLive | #SlaveryandMemory

VIEW HERE: The Lapidus Center Presents: Slavery and Memory on Livestream

Continue reading “VIDEO: The Lapidus Center Presents Slavery and Memory x Whitney Plantation”

BOOK: Hartman’s Lose Your Mother

Hartman, Lose Your Mother

Saidiya V. Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007.

via Farrar, Straus and Giroux:

In Lose Your Mother, Saidiya Hartman traces the history of the Atlantic slave trade by recounting a journey she took along a slave route in Ghana. Following the trail of captives from the hinterland to the Atlantic coast, she reckons with the blank slate of her own genealogy and vividly dramatizes the effects of slavery on three centuries of African and African American history.The slave, Hartman observes, is a stranger—torn from family, home, and country. To lose your mother is to be severed from your kin, to forget your past, and to inhabit the world as an outsider. There are no known survivors of Hartman’s lineage, no relatives in Ghana whom she came hoping to find. She is a stranger in search of strangers, and this fact leads her into intimate engagements with the people she encounters along the way and with figures from the past whose lives were shattered and transformed by the slave trade. Written in prose that is fresh, insightful, and deeply affecting, Lose Your Mother is a “landmark text” (Robin D. G. Kelley, author of Freedom Dreams).

Editor’s Note: The first in a series of long overdue additions to #ADPhD. Subscribe to the RSS feed for regular updates.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: