ARTICLE: Semley on “To Live and Die, Free and French”

 
Toussaint Louverture [Image fixe] : chef des noirs insurgés de Saint Domingue (entre 1796 et 1799) / Collection de Vinck. Un siècle d'histoire de France par l'estampe, 1770-1870. Vol. 44
Toussaint Louverture: chef des noirs insurgés de Saint Domingue (entre 1796 et 1799) / Collection de Vinck. Un siècle d’histoire de France par l’estampe, 1770-1870. Vol. 44 / BNF
Lorelle D. Semley, “To Live and Die, Free and French Toussaint Louverture’s 1801 Constitution and the Original Challenge of Black Citizenship.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (2013): 65–90.

Abstract:

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ARTICLE/JOURNAL: Radical History Review Special Issue: Haitian Lives/Global Perspectives

Je renais de mes cendres (via The Public Archive)

The Winter 2013 Radical History Review is a special issue: “Haitian Lives/Global Perspectives.”

From the introduction:

As several of the essays in this issue explain, in the years since Michel-Rolph Trouillot famously showed that the Haitian Revolution was “unthinkable” and its his- tory relegated to silence, the country’s history has gone from “hidden” and “unknow- able” to widely studied in the United States and beyond.2 The 2010 earthquake did stimulate a burst of interest in Haiti and its past among both scholars and the general public abroad. As sudden as this awakening may have seemed, however, to understand Haiti better people looked to a body of research, writing, and reflection by Haiti specialists that had been decades in the making. Yet, a great deal of mis- information, and in fact disinformation, persists alongside Haiti’s new cachet, and the perspectives of Haitians themselves are chronically absent from the discussion.

Table of Contents:

Amy Chazkel, Melina Pappademos, and Karen Sotiropoulos. “Editor’s Introduction: Haitian Lives/Global Perspectives.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 1–9.

Gary Wilder. “Telling Histories: A Conversation with Laurent Dubois and Greg Grandin.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 11–25.

April Mayes, Yolanda C. Martín, Carlos Ulises Decena, Kiran Jayaram, and Yveline Alexis. “Transnational Hispaniola: Toward New Paradigms in Haitian and Dominican Studies.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 26–32.

Simon R. Doubleday. “History After the Earthquake: Shifting the Axis of Teaching.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 33–44.

Paul Cheney. “A Colonial Cul De Sac Plantation Life in Wartime Saint-Domingue, 1775 – 1782.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter, 2013): 45–64.

Lorelle D. Semley. “To Live and Die, Free and French Toussaint Louverture’s 1801 Constitution and the Original Challenge of Black Citizenship.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 65–90.

Peter James Hudson. “The National City Bank of New York and Haiti, 1909 – 1922.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 91–114.

Jana K. Lipman. “‘The Fish Trusts the Water, and It Is in the Water That It Is Cooked’ The Caribbean Origins of the Krome Detention Center.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 115–141.

A. Naomi Paik. “Carceral Quarantine at Guantánamo Legacies of US Imprisonment of Haitian Refugees, 1991 – 1994.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 142–168.

Leah Gordon. “Kanaval Vodou, Politics, and Revolution in the Streets of Haiti.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 169–183.

Jerry Philogene. “Meditations on Traveling Diasporically: Jean-Ulrick Désert and Negerhosen2000.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 184–193.

David Geggus. “Haiti and Its Revolution: Four Recent Books.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 195–202.

Matthew J. Smith. “Haiti from the Outside In: A Review of Recent Literature.” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 203–211.

Toussaint Losier. “Jean Anil Louis-Juste, Prezan!” Radical History Review 2013, no. 115 (Winter 2013): 213–217.

Featured Image Credit: “Je renais de mes cendres” posted at the Public Archive: “…The reverse bears the inscription Les armoiries du Roi Henry Christophe, 1767-1820, Bâtisseur de La Citadelle (The arms of King Henry Christophe, 1767-1820, Builder of the Citadel). In the middle is the king’s coat of arms, a crowned phoenix rising from the flames, with stars in the firmament and the words, Je renais de mes cendres. (I am reborn from my ashes.)…”