ARTICLE: Morgan on Partus Sequitur Ventrem: Law, Race, and Reproduction in Colonial Slavery

Jennifer L. Morgan; Partus sequitur ventrem: Law, Race, and Reproduction in Colonial Slavery. Small Axe 1 March 2018; 22 (1 (55)): 1–17. doi: https://doi.org/10.1215/07990537-4378888

Abstract:

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VIDEO/CONF: Scenes at 20 – Inspirations, Riffs, and Reverberations

This symposium celebrates the 20th anniversary of Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America and its impact on studies of Black lives in the past, present, and future. Please join us as we consider the work’s impact within its intergenerational intellectual context and theorize new possibilities for Black life and Black freedom in these perilous times.

 

For more on the conference: http://www.scenesat20.com/
Footage from the panels is available and livestreams are available for each day.
via YouTube:

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ARTICLES: Connolly and Fuentes Co-Edit Special Issue on Archives of Slavery

Scholars of slavery engage history, archives, Saidiya Hartman, and violence, in a recent History of the Present. From the introduction by Brian Connolly and Marisa Fuentes:

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Morgan on Thinking with Black Marxism | @AAIHS

Dutch Representation of Africans from 1686 (Credit: Schomburg Center Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Archives Division, Description De L’afrique Collection)

Jennifer Morgan discusses Cedric Robinson’s work on Black Marxism and its relationship to histories of slavery at AAIHS: Continue reading “Morgan on Thinking with Black Marxism | @AAIHS”

ARTICLE: Morgan on Race and Gender in the History of the Early Republic

Credit: "Philadelphia fashions, 1837," Edward Williams Clay via Library Company of Philadelphia Print Dept. Political Cartoons http://bit.ly/2aabmhy
Credit: “Philadelphia fashions, 1837,” Edward Williams Clay via Library Company of Philadelphia Print Dept. Political Cartoons http://bit.ly/2aabmhy
Jennifer L. Morgan, “Periodization Problems: Race and Gender in the History of the Early Republic.” Journal of the Early Republic 36, no. 2 (2016): 351–57.

Morgan writes:

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VIDEO: Morgan, ‘Partus Sequitur Ventrem’: Law and Re/Production for Enslaved Women

Keynote Address by Professor Jennifer Morgan, New York University to the conference Pregnancy, Childbearing and Infant Care: Historical Perspectives from Slave and Non-Slave Societies

Part of the Research Network ‘Mothering Slaves: Comparative Perspectives on Motherhood, Childlessness and the Care of Children in Atlantic Slave Societies’

Newcastle University, 8 April 2015

ARTICLE/JOURNAL/DIGITAL: Social Text Special Issue on Slavery, Freedom, and the Archive

Special Issue of Social Text (33:4, 2015) on “The Question of Recovery: Slavery, Freedom, and the Archive,” including a roundtable on slavery, mapping, and the digital humanities. Guest edited by Laura Helton, Justin Leroy, Max A. Mishler, Samantha Seeley, and Shauna Sweeney

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Berry and Morgan: #Blacklivesmatter Till They Don’t: Slavery’s Lasting Legacy

“We live in a nation that has yet to grapple with the history of slavery and its afterlife.” – Daina Ramey Berry and Jennifer L. Morgan

In an essay for The American Prospect, slavery scholars Daina Ramey Berry and Jennifer L. Morgan place #blacklivesmatter protests around the world in context with “the historical value of black life and the casual killing of Eric Garner:”

“In less than a month, our nation will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery. This should be a time of celebratory reflection, yet Wednesday night, after another grand jury failed to see the value of African-American life, protesters took to the streets chanting, “Black lives matter!…”

Continue reading “Berry and Morgan: #Blacklivesmatter Till They Don’t: Slavery’s Lasting Legacy”

Women of Color and Slavery in the United States

In the summer of 2007, the Journal of Women’s History (19:2) published a roundtable on “The History of Women and Slavery: Considering the Impact of Ar’n’t I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South on the Twentieth Anniversary of Its Publication.”

According to the “Introduction” by Jennifer L. Morgan, the roundtable was originally a series of papers presented in June 2005 at the 13th Berkshire Conference on the History of Women at Scripps College in Claremont, California. The 7 essays consider Deborah Gray White’s landmark work, Ar’n’t I A Woman: Female Slaves in the Plantation South (originally published in 1985) and the state of scholarship on women of color during the period of slavery, including strides made by enterprising women in the field. The article received the 2007 Letitia Woods Brown Article Prize from the Association of Black Women Historians.

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Journal of Women’s History (19:2), Summer 2007

Roundtable: “The History of Women and Slavery: Considering the Impact of Ar’n’t I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South on the Twentieth Anniversary of Its Publication.”

Jennifer Morgan, “Introduction.”

Daina Ramey Berry, “Teaching Ar’n’t I a Woman?”

Stephanie M. H. Camp, “Ar’n’t I a Woman? in the Vanguard of the History of Race and Sex in the United States.”

Leslie M. Harris, “Ar’n’t I a Woman?, Gender, and Slavery Studies.”

Barbara Krauthamer, “Ar’n’t I a Woman? Native Americans, Gender, and Slavery”

Jessica Millward, “More History Than Myth: African American Women’s History Since the Publication of Ar’n’t I a Woman?”

Deborah Gray White, “Afterword: A Response.”