JAAH 93:4: Special Issue on the End of the Slave Trade

The Journal of African American History volume 93:4 is a special issue commemorating the bicentennial of the outlawing of the Atlantic slave trade by the United States.

First paragraph steal from the introduction by journal editor and Distinguished Professor of History at the University of California, Riverside V. P. Franklin:

“The year 2008 marks the bicentennial of the end of legal participation of United States citizens in the transatlantic slave trade. Under the terms of compromises that were made to gain southem slaveholders’ support for the ratification of the U.S. Constitution in 1789, members of the Congress were banned from prohibiting the importation of enslaved Africans into the United States until 1808. In light of the successful slave revolt on Saint Domingue leading to the birth of Haiti, the second republic in the New World (1791-1804); Gabriel Prosser’s unsuccessful slave insurrection in Virginia in 1800; and the

decision by the members of Parliametit in 1807 to outlaw British participation in the transatlantic slave trade, the Congress voted to ban the importation of enslaved Africans into the United States as of 1 January 1808.”

Articles:

INTRODUCTION: ENDING THE TRANSATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE: BICENTENNIAL RESEARCH, REFLECTIONS, AND COMMEMORATIONS.
Franklin, V. P.

“I NEVER HAVE SUCH A SICKLY SHIP BEFORE”: DIET, DISEASE, AND MORTALITY IN 18TH-CENTURY ATLANTIC SLAVING VOYAGES
Mustakeem, Sowande’

RESISTANCE AND COLLABORATION: POLITICAL STRATEGIES WITHIN THE AFRO-CAROLINIAN SLAVE COMMUNITY, 1700-1750
Kyles, Perry L.

THE SLAVING BRIG HENRIQUETA AND HER EVIL SISTERS: A CASE STUDY IN THE 19th-CENTURY ILLEGAL SLAVE TRADE TO BRAZIL
Tinnie, Dinizulu Gene

REFLECTIONS ON THE BICENTENNIAL OF THE ABOLITION OF THE BRITISH SLAVE TRADE
Kerr-Ritchie, J. R.

CROSS-CULTURAL COMMEMORATION: FROM THE SLAVE TRADE ABOLITION BICENTENNIAL TO CARNIVAL MESSIAH
Franklin, V. P.

Available through EbscoHost (sub only)

(Click image for credit or go here)

Black Atlantic Political Culture (Anglophone)

Van Gosse. “As a Nation, the English Are Our Friends: The Emergence of African American Politics in the British Atlantic World, 1772-1861.” The American Historical Review 113, no. 4 (October 1, 2008): 1003-1028.

First paragraph:

We know little about David Walker.
Yet in his day, he was the most notorious black man in the United
States. Probably born in 1796, a free emigrant from the lower South who
became a used clothes dealer in Boston, in 1829 and 1830 he published
three editions of his pamphlet Walker’s Appeal, in Four Articles, Together with a Preamble, to the Coloured Citizens of the World,
planning to smuggle it into the South via the black and white sailors
who were his customers. His hope was to confront slave owners, warning
them with apocalyptic arguments to repent, and the slaves themselves,
demanding that they renounce enslavement. If the masters refused their
just demands, he said, justice should come down in blood.

J. R. Kerr-RitchieRites of August First: Emancipation Day in the Black Atlantic World. (Antislavery, Abolition, and the Atlantic World.) Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2007.

In his review, Barry Higman writes that:

“The principal contribution of J. R. Kerr-Ritchie’s valuable new book is
to draw together the experience of the British West Indies and the
United States, focusing on the period between the formal abolition of
slavery in the British colonies in 1834 and Abraham Lincoln’s
Emancipation Proclamation.”

Find the review in the October 2008 American Historical Review.  Buy the book here.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: