Baptist: America’s Economy Was Built on Slavery, Not White Ingenuity—Historians Should Tell It Like It Is | Alternet


Read an excerpt from The Half has Never Been Told by Ed Baptist at Alternet: Continue reading “Baptist: America’s Economy Was Built on Slavery, Not White Ingenuity—Historians Should Tell It Like It Is | Alternet”

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Hudson on The Racist Dawn of Capitalism | Boston Review

Peter James Hudson reviews three recent history of slavery and capitalism texts to place them in conversation with radical black scholarship and political thought, past and present:

Continue reading “Hudson on The Racist Dawn of Capitalism | Boston Review”

Baptist on What Whites Refuse to Believe About Slavery | The Guardian

“In 1845, Frederick Douglass, a fugitive from slavery, joined dozens of white passengers on the British ship Cambria in New York harbor. Somewhere out on the Atlantic, the other passengers discovered that the African American activist in their midst had just published a sensational autobiography. They convinced the captain to host a sort of salon, wherein Douglass would tell them his life story. But when the young black man stood up to talk, a group of Southern slaveholders, on their way to Britain for vacation or business or both, confronted him. Every time Douglass said something about what it was like to be enslaved, they shouted him down: Lies! Lies! Slaves were treated well, insisted the slaveholders; after all, they said, the masters remained financially interested in the health of their human “property”.

In a review of my book about slavery and capitalism published the other day, the Economist treated it the same way that the tourist enslavers treated the testimony of Frederick Douglass on that slave-era ship long ago. In doing so, the Economist revealed just how many white people remain reluctant to believe black people about the experience of being black.

Apparently, I shouldn’t have focused my historical research on how some people lived off the uncompensated sweat of their “valuable property”, the magazine’s anonymous reviewer wrote: “Almost all the blacks in his book are victims, almost all the whites villains.” Worst of all, this book reviewer went on, I had, by putting the testimony of “a few slaves” at the heart of book about slavery, somehow abandoned “objectivity”’ for “advocacy”….”

Read the rest: Edward Baptist | The Economist’s review of my book reveals how white people still refuse to believe black people about being black | The Guardian

Baptist On “What the Economist Doesn’t Get About Slavery” in POLITICO Magazine

“We think of authors as people who lay themselves bare in their books, but perhaps reviewers of books reveal their innermost fears and beliefs as well. That can be true even when—as in the distinguished British periodical the Economist, founded in 1843—the reviewers hide behind anonymity. When Mr./Ms. Anonymous of the Economist reviewed my book The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism on Sept. 4, they didn’t much care for it, and that didn’t surprise me. In the last couple of decades, the Economist and its suspender-wearing core readers have usually been reliable allies of market fundamentalism—the idea that everything would be better if measured first and last by its efficiency at producing profit. I, on the other hand, argue in the book that U.S. cotton slavery created—and still taints—the modern capitalist economy which the Economist sometimes seems to prescribe as the cure for all ills. I’d like to think we all agree that slavery was evil. If slavery was profitable—and it was—then it creates an unforgiving paradox for the moral authority of markets—and market fundamentalists. What else, today, might be immoral and yet profitable?”

Read the rest: Edward Baptist | What the Economist Doesn’t Get About Slavery – POLITICO Magazine.

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