Ferrer Interviewed by the Public Archive

The Public Archive recently interviewed Ada Ferrer about her latest book, Freedom’s Mirror: Cuba and Haiti in the Age of Revolution (2014): FERRER: “Among slaves and people of color you see something equivalent. Many scholars have argued that the Haitian Revolution –to quote Eugene Genovese—“propelled a revolution in consciousness” among African Americans. I agree, but again it was one based on material contact and knowledge. … Continue reading Ferrer Interviewed by the Public Archive

BOOK: Hunter on Southern Black Women After the Civil War

Tera W. Hunter, To “Joy My Freedom:” Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors after the Civil War. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998. via Harvard University Press: “As the Civil War drew to a close, newly emancipated black women workers made their way to Atlanta—the economic hub of the newly emerging urban and industrial south—in order to build an independent and free life on the … Continue reading BOOK: Hunter on Southern Black Women After the Civil War

CFP: José Antonio Aponte and His World (NYU)

CFP: José Antonio Aponte and His World: Writing, Painting, and Making Freedom in the African Diaspora Date: May 8-9, 2015 Location: New York University, King Juan Carlos Center, 53 Washington Square South, Auditorium Over the past fifteen years, scholars have shown a renewed interest in the political and historical legacy of José Antonio Aponte (?-1812), a free man of color, carpenter, artist, and alleged leader of a massive … Continue reading CFP: José Antonio Aponte and His World (NYU)

Rael on Ferguson, Respectability Politics, and the Early Republic

Six months after the murder of Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, it is worth revisiting scholars’ reflections on what his death, extrajudicial killings of people of African descent, and histories of slavery and diaspora have in common. Last August, Patrick Rael placed present-day re-articulations of respectability politics against a long history of black political rhetoric, beginning with antebellum free black activists’ debates about moral uplift … Continue reading Rael on Ferguson, Respectability Politics, and the Early Republic

CFP: Black Code Studies

Originally posted on Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog:
Black Code Studies The Black Scholar Special Issue on Digital Black Studies Editors: Mark Anthony Neal, Professor, Duke University Jessica Marie Johnson, Assistant Professor, Michigan State University The editors of this special issue argue black studies, activism, and life online and off have reached a critical point of convergence. Technology has irrevocably changed the way artists, activists, scholars,… Continue reading CFP: Black Code Studies

Kelley: Michael Brown Was One of “We the People,” Too

  Six months after the murder of Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, it is worth revisiting scholars’ reflections on what his death, extrajudicial killings of people of African descent, and histories of slavery and diaspora have in common. Last August, Blair L. M. Kelley reminded us of another infamous Missouri court case–Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857): “And initially, a St. Louis circuit court ruled that … Continue reading Kelley: Michael Brown Was One of “We the People,” Too

Bonner on Black Politics in a New World

Over at the African American Intellectual History Society Blog, Christopher Bonner discusses free black activism (and extralegal violence against them) in the United States after the Civil War: “Perhaps Henry Highland Garnet was accustomed to having his life threatened. In early August 1865, the black activist and orator, who had spent most of his life in New York, sat as an honorary delegate at a … Continue reading Bonner on Black Politics in a New World

ARTICLE: Cardyn on Sexualized Racism/Gendered KKK Violence

  Lisa Cardyn, “Sexualized Racism/Gendered Violence: Outraging the Body Politic in the Reconstruction South.” Michigan Law Review 100, no. 4 (February 2002): 675. doi:10.2307/1290425. “This Article examines the calculated deployment of sexualized violence by the Reconstruction-era klans and its relationship to competing notions of justice, citizenship, and sexual propriety. Exploring what is distinctly sexual about klan terror–the sheer pervasiveness, intensity, and ideological coherence of these … Continue reading ARTICLE: Cardyn on Sexualized Racism/Gendered KKK Violence

ARTICLE: Neidenbach on Madame Marie Couvent, a Free Woman of Color in New Orleans

Elizabeth C. Neidenbach, “‘Mes dernières volontés’: Testaments to the Life of Marie Couvent, a Former Slave in New Orleans.” Transatlantica. Revue d’études américaines. American Studies Journal, no. 2 (October 10, 2012). http://transatlantica.revues.org/6186. “In her last will and testament, recorded on November 12, 1832, Marie Justine Cirnaire, Veuve Couvent left specific instructions about how her estate should be divided. After three decades in New Orleans this … Continue reading ARTICLE: Neidenbach on Madame Marie Couvent, a Free Woman of Color in New Orleans