BLOG: Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina (2010)

  Johnston, Angelina Ray, and Wise, Robinson. “Commemorating Faithful Slaves, Mammies, and Black Confederates.” Blog. Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina, March 19, 2010. http://docsouth.unc.edu/commland/features/essays/ray_wise/. “…Anxious to refute any suggestion that slavery had required the dehumanization of African Americans, white Southerners recalled their enslaved caretakers as willing “servants” who had been content, even grateful, for their lot in life. These commemorative gestures, which only hinted at … Continue reading BLOG: Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina (2010)

Online Now! “Death Rites as Birthrights in Atlantic New Orleans” by Me (@jmjafrx)

Originally posted on Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog:
VERY EXCITED to announce this…. My journal article, “Death Rites as Birthrights in Atlantic New Orleans: Kinship and Race in the Case of María Teresa v. Perine Dauphine,” is in the next issue of Slavery & Abolition…and it is LIVE online RIGHT NOW at Taylor & Francis. Jessica Marie Johnson, “Death Rites as Birthrights in Atlantic New Orleans:… Continue reading Online Now! “Death Rites as Birthrights in Atlantic New Orleans” by Me (@jmjafrx)

TALK: The Race for Digitality | Roopika Risam

At African Diaspora 2.0, Roopika Risam of #DHPoco: Postcolonial Digital Humanities discussed the tension between digital humanities and African diaspora studies. An excerpt: “…In the race for digitality, we find ourselves struggling to understand the relationship between our deep investments in discourses like intersectional feminism or critical race theory and digital humanities. The burden of representation falls on us. Our acts of representation should not … Continue reading TALK: The Race for Digitality | Roopika Risam

Interview: The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others | The UCSB Current

H/T – The Repeating Islands – Andrea Estrada interviews Esther Lezra on her new book The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others (Routledge, 2014): “It was important to show that the representational patterns that we use today are inheritors of an early representational rhetoric that was intrinsically tied up with material violence and injustice endured by peoples who were subjected to empire and colonialism,” Lezra said. … Continue reading Interview: The Colonial Art of Demonizing Others | The UCSB Current

SOURCE: Controversial Literature in The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society | Readex

“The September release of The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922, contains many documents categorized as “controversial literature.” This bibliographical term describes works that argue against or express opposition to individual religious and monastic orders, individual religions, individual Christian denominations, and sacred works. Unsurprisingly, much of the controversy in the following documents surrounds Biblical interpretations of the institution of slavery…” Controversial Literature in The American Slavery Collection, … Continue reading SOURCE: Controversial Literature in The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society | Readex

AUDIO: Berry and Harris on Urban Slavery | 15 Minute History

    Daina Ramey Berry and Leslie Brown discuss urban slavery in the United States on 15 Minute History: “When most people think about slavery in the United States, they think of large agricultural plantations and picture slaves working in the fields harvesting crops. But for a significant number of slaves, their experience involved working in houses, factories, and on the docks of the South’s … Continue reading AUDIO: Berry and Harris on Urban Slavery | 15 Minute History

Baptist on What Whites Refuse to Believe About Slavery | The Guardian

“In 1845, Frederick Douglass, a fugitive from slavery, joined dozens of white passengers on the British ship Cambria in New York harbor. Somewhere out on the Atlantic, the other passengers discovered that the African American activist in their midst had just published a sensational autobiography. They convinced the captain to host a sort of salon, wherein Douglass would tell them his life story. But when … Continue reading Baptist on What Whites Refuse to Believe About Slavery | The Guardian

Baptist On “What the Economist Doesn’t Get About Slavery” in POLITICO Magazine

“We think of authors as people who lay themselves bare in their books, but perhaps reviewers of books reveal their innermost fears and beliefs as well. That can be true even when—as in the distinguished British periodical the Economist, founded in 1843—the reviewers hide behind anonymity. When Mr./Ms. Anonymous of the Economist reviewed my book The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making … Continue reading Baptist On “What the Economist Doesn’t Get About Slavery” in POLITICO Magazine