CONF: Liberated Africans and Digital Humanities

AfricanDiasporaReconsideredProgram

Hosted by University of California-Irvine:

While the transatlantic slave trade lasted nearly four centuries, over one quarter, or 2.9 million enslaved Africans, disembarked in the Americas-and to a lesser extent in Africa- after 1807. About 174,000 of this 2.9 million were “re-captured” by naval vessels, mainly British, charged with suppressing this traffic. These were the “Liberated Africans”. As this population crossed the boundaries of slavery and freedom many times, they reshaped their identities as their faced various systems of race and ethnic classification across imperial boundaries. The locally bounded and trans-nationally-linked meanings of slavery and freedom, as well as race and ethnicity in the nineteenth century will be the focus of this meeting. By gathering scholars experienced on digital research, the first goal of this conference is examining the use of databases, Geographical Information Systems, sound recordings, online storage, and other digital tools to maximize collaborative research, education, and outreach for African Diaspora Studies. The conference organizers gratefully acknowledge the generous co-sponsorship of the University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI), the UC Irvine Humanities Collective, the Huntington Library, the UC-Cuba Academic Initiative, the Spatial History Project (Stanford University), the UCLA Department of History, the UC Berkeley Department of African American Studies, the UC Irvine Department of African American Studies, and the UC Irvine Department of History.

All sessions are free and open to public. For further information, please contact the UCI Department of History at (949) 824-6521 or history@uci.edu.

October 1-2, 2013

For more: Liberated Africans and Digital Humanities: African Diaspora Reconsidered.

(H/T Jessica Millward on FB)

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DIGITAL: New Resource – “Slave Revolt in Jamaica, 1760-1761: A Cartographic Narrative”

Slave Revolt in Jamaica, 1760-1761

Vincent Brown (Harvard University) unveils a new resource for studying slavery and slave revolt in Jamaica:

via Slave Revolt in Jamaica, 1760-1761:

This animated thematic map narrates the spatial history of the greatest slave insurrection in the eighteenth century British Empire.  To teachers and researchers, the presentation offers a carefully curated archive of key documentary evidence.  To all viewers, the map suggests an argument about the strategies of the rebels and the tactics of counterinsurgency, about the importance of the landscape to the course of the uprising, and about the difficulty of representing such events cartographically with available sources.  Although this cartographic narration cannot be taken as an exhaustive database—for instance, it does not examine major themes such as belonging and affiliation among the insurgents or the larger imperial context and interconnected Atlantic world— the map offers an illuminating interpretation of the military campaign’s spatial dynamics….

….Mapping the great Jamaican insurrection of 1760-61 allows us to see how the island’s topography shaped the course of the revolt, how the rebellion included at least three major uprisings, and how its suppression required the sequenced collaboration of several distinct elements of British military power.  From the cartographic evidence, it appears that the insurrection was in fact a well-planned affair that posed a genuine strategic threat, checked ultimately by an effective counterinsurgency.  Yet if the map draws a clearer picture of the extent and contours of the insurrection, it cannot convey the ambition, hope, desperation, shock, dread, alarm, cruelty, bloodlust, and sheer mayhem of the experience.  These are matters left to the historical imagination of viewers and readers.

More on Tacky’s Revolt (via Project Description):

In 1760, some fifteen hundred enslaved black men and women— perhaps fewer but probably many more— took advantage of Britain’s Seven Year’s War against France and Spain, to stage a massive uprising in Jamaica, which began on April 7 in the windward parish of St. Mary’s and continued in the leeward parishes until October of the next year.  Over the course of eighteen months the rebels killed as many as sixty whites and destroyed many thousands of pounds worth of property.  During the suppression of the revolt over five hundred black men and women were killed in battle, executed, or committed suicide.  Another 500 were transported from the island for life.  Colonists valued the total cost to the island at nearly a quarter of a million pounds. “Whether we consider the extent and secrecy of its plan, the multitude of the conspirators, and the difficulty of opposing its eruptions in such a variety of places at once,” wrote planter-historian Edward Long in his 1774 History of Jamaica, this revolt was “more formidable than any hitherto known in the West Indies.”[1]

Explore the site here.

Image Credit: “Soulevement des Negres à la Jamaique en 1759, ” as shown in David Francois’ “Histoire d’Angleterre” (Paris, 1800), Vol. 3 .

BOOK/NEWS: Second Edition of Jordan’s White Over Black Released

White Over Black

Winthrop D. Jordan. White Over Black: American Attitudes Toward the Negro, 1550-1812, 2nd Ed. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.

via UNC Press:

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