TOC: Slavery & Abolition 34:1

The latest issue of Slavery & Abolition includes the following articles: Scrambling for Slaves: Captive Sales in Colonial South Carolina Sean Kelley Pages: 1-21 The Penalty of a Tyrant’s Law: Landscapes of Incarceration during the Second Slavery Kelly Birch & Thomas C. Buchanan Pages: 22-38 The British Honduras Colony: Black Emigrationist Support for Colonization in the Lincoln Presidency Phillip W. Magness Pages: 39-60 The Presence … Continue reading TOC: Slavery & Abolition 34:1

ARTICLE/CONF: Cleall Reviews 2012 Legacies of British Slave-Ownership Conference at University College of London

Esmé R. Cleall. “Emancipation, Slave-Ownership and the Remaking of The British Imperial World, University College London, 29–31 March 2012.” History Workshop Journal 75, no. 1 (April 1, 2013): 307–310. Excerpt: This conference came out of the ESRC-funded Legacies of British Slave-Ownership Project (LBS) at University College London. Since April 2009 the LBS group has been investigating the legacies of British slavery, and in particular, the afterlife … Continue reading ARTICLE/CONF: Cleall Reviews 2012 Legacies of British Slave-Ownership Conference at University College of London

BOOK: Clark on Free Women of Color in the Revolutionary Atlantic

Emily Clark. The Strange History of the American Quadroon: Free Women of Color in the Revolutionary Atlantic World. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013. via University of North Carolina Press: Exotic, seductive, and doomed: the antebellum mixed-race free woman of color has long operated as a metaphor for New Orleans. Commonly known as a “quadroon,” she and the city she represents rest irretrievably … Continue reading BOOK: Clark on Free Women of Color in the Revolutionary Atlantic

20 Years of the Black Atlantic at Africa in Words

Africa in Words is running a series of posts on Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, in celebration of the 20th anniversary of its release.  Click here to read the second post of the series and here to read the third. Nara Improta begins with a review of the famous work: “This year, Gilroy’s Black Atlantic completed twenty years of its publication. This book … Continue reading 20 Years of the Black Atlantic at Africa in Words

BOOK: Jones on The Métis of Senegal

Hilary Jones. The Métis of Senegal: Urban Life and Politics in French West Africa. Indiana University Press, 2013. via Indiana University Press: The Métis of Senegal is a history of politics and society among an influential group of mixed-race people who settled in coastal Africa under French colonialism. Hilary Jones describes how the métis carved out a niche as middleman traders for European merchants. As … Continue reading BOOK: Jones on The Métis of Senegal

BOOK: Carretta on Phillis Wheatley

Vincent Carretta. Phillis Wheatley: Biography of a Genius in Bondage. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2011. via University of Georgia Press: “With Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1773), Phillis Wheatley (1753?–1784) became the first English-speaking person of African descent to publish a book and only the second woman—of any race or background— to do so in America. Written in Boston while she was … Continue reading BOOK: Carretta on Phillis Wheatley

ARTICLE: Sanborn on Plagiarism in Clotel

Geoffrey Sanborn. “‘People Will Pay to Hear the Drama’: Plagiarism in Clotel.” African American Review 45, no. 1 (2012): 65–82. Excerpt: It is no secret that William Wells Brown did not write everything that appears under his name in Clotel; or, the President’s Daughter, the first published novel by an African American. Since 1969, when William Edward Farrison published an edition of Clotel with extensive … Continue reading ARTICLE: Sanborn on Plagiarism in Clotel

ARTICLE: Hayes on Peter and King, Benjamin Franklin’s Slaves

Kevin J. Hayes. “New Light on Peter and King, the Two Slaves Benjamin Franklin Brought to England.” Notes and Queries (March 27, 2013).  Excerpt: “WHEN Benjamin Franklin went to London on behalf of the Pennsylvania assembly in 1757, his son William accompanied him. In addition, they brought along two slaves. Peter served as personal servant to Benjamin Franklin, and William brought King to serve him in … Continue reading ARTICLE: Hayes on Peter and King, Benjamin Franklin’s Slaves