Envisioning Emancipation Cover

BOOK: Willis and Krauthamer on Envisioning Emancipation

Deborah Willis and Barbara Krauthamer. Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery. First Edition. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2012. via Temple University Press: The Emancipation Proclamation is one of the most important documents in American history. As we commemorate its 150th anniversary, what do we really know about those who experienced slavery? In their pioneering book, Envisioning Emancipation, renowned photographic historian Deborah Willis … Continue reading BOOK: Willis and Krauthamer on Envisioning Emancipation

Monument to Slaves

TODAY: International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

"Forever Free: Celebrating Emancipation"

March 25th is United Nations International Day of Remembrance of Slavery Victims and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. The theme for 2013 is ‘Forever Free: Celebrating Emancipation:’

For over 400 years, more than 15 million men, women and children were the victims of the tragic transatlantic slave trade, one of the darkest chapters in human history.

The annual observance of 25 March as the International Day of Remembrance for the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade serves as an opportunity to honour and remember those who suffered and died at the hands of the brutal slavery system, and to raise awareness about the dangers of racism and prejudice today.

Continue reading “TODAY: International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade”

VA Life Insurance Register

Shepard on Insurance Policy Registers and Post-Civil War Virginia

“Judy Batte of Hicksford, Virginia, a “house servant,” was the first African American to secure a policy, in February 1872, and she was followed by a fairly steady stream of men and women of her race. In fact, as the company grew and its client base became more national in scope, women made up an increasing percentage of policyholders…” Continue reading Shepard on Insurance Policy Registers and Post-Civil War Virginia

Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe: 1930-2013

Chinua Achebe

In Depth Africa reports the death of Nigerian novelist Chinua Achebe:

“Foremost novelist, Prof Chinua Achebe, is dead. He was 82.

Reporters  learnt he died last night in a hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

A source close to the family said the professor had been ill for a while and was hospitalised in an undisclosed hospital in Boston.

The source declined to provide further details, saying the family will issue a statement on the development later today.

Contacted, spokesperson for Brown University, where Mr. Achebe worked until he took ill, Darlene Trewcrist, is yet to respond to our enquiries on the professor’s condition.

Until his death, Prof Achebe was the David and Marianna Fisher University Professor and Professor of Africana Studies at Brown.

Below is how the university profiled him on its website.

“Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe is known the world over for having played a seminal role in the founding and development of African literature. He continues to be considered among the most significant world writers. He is most well known for the groundbreaking 1958 novel Things Fall Apart, a novel still considered to be required reading the world over. It has sold over twelve million copies and has been translated into more than fifty languages.

“Achebe’s global significance lies not only in his talent and recognition as a writer, but also as a critical thinker and essayist who has written extensively on questions of the role of culture in Africa and the social and political significance of aesthetics and analysis of the postcolonial state in Africa. He is renowned, for example, for “An Image of Africa,” his trenchant and famous critique of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. Today, this critique is recognized as one of the most generative interventions on Conrad; and one that opened the social study of literary texts, particularly the impact of power relations on 20th century literary imagination…”

The Guardian reports:

“Chinua Achebe, the Nigerian novelist seen by millions as the father of African literature, has died at the age of 82.

Continue reading “Chinua Achebe: 1930-2013”

The Slaves Who Defeated Napoleon

BOOK: Girard on the Haitian Revolution

Philippe R. Girard, The Slaves Who Defeated Napoleon: Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian War of Independence, 1801-1804. University Alabama Press, 2011. via University of Alabama Press: To a contemporary audience, Haiti brings to mind Voodoo spells, Tontons Macoutes, and boat people–nothing worth fighting over. Two centuries ago, however, Haiti, then known as Saint-Domingue, was the “Pearl of the Antilles,” France’s most valuable overseas colony, the largest … Continue reading BOOK: Girard on the Haitian Revolution

Atlantic Creoles

BOOK: Landers on Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions

Jane G. Landers. Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions. Reprint. Harvard University Press, 2011. via HUP: Sailing the tide of a tumultuous era of Atlantic revolutions, a remarkable group of African-born and African-descended individuals transformed themselves from slaves into active agents of their lives and times. Big Prince Whitten, the black Seminole Abraham, and General Georges Biassou were “Atlantic creoles,” Africans who found their way … Continue reading BOOK: Landers on Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions

Cover: Lose Your Mother

BOOK: Hartman’s Lose Your Mother

Saidiya V. Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007. via Farrar, Straus and Giroux: In Lose Your Mother, Saidiya Hartman traces the history of the Atlantic slave trade by recounting a journey she took along a slave route in Ghana. Following the trail of captives from the hinterland to the Atlantic coast, she reckons with the … Continue reading BOOK: Hartman’s Lose Your Mother

Nassau

ARTICLE: Winsboro and Knetsch on the ‘Saltwater Railroad’

Irvin D. S. Winsboro, and Joe Knetsch. “Florida Slaves, the ‘Saltwater Railroad’ to the Bahamas, and Anglo-American Diplomacy.” Journal of Southern History 79, no. 1 (February 2013): 51–78. Abstract: A case study is presented on what is referred to as the saltwater railroad, or the escape route used by U.S. fugitive slaves from St. Augustine, Florida to Nassau in the British Bahamas during the late … Continue reading ARTICLE: Winsboro and Knetsch on the ‘Saltwater Railroad’

Sweet Liberty

BOOK: Schloss on Slavery and Liberty in Martinique

Rebecca Hartkopf Schloss, Sweet Liberty: the Final Days of Slavery in Martinique (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009). via University of Pennsylvania Press: From its founding, Martinique played an integral role in France’s Atlantic empire. Established in the mid-seventeenth century as a colonial outpost against Spanish and English dominance in the Caribbean, the island was transformed by the increase in European demand for sugar, coffee, … Continue reading BOOK: Schloss on Slavery and Liberty in Martinique

Rachael Pringle

CHAPTERS: Fuentes and Newman in Historicising Gender and Sexuality

Kevin P. Murphy and Jennifer M. Spear, eds. Historicising Gender and Sexuality. (Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011). via Wiley-Blackwell: Historicising Gender and Sexuality features a diverse collection of essays that shed new light on the historical intersections between gender and sexuality across time and space. Demonstrates both the particularities of specific formulations of gender and sexuality and the nature of the relationship between the categories themselves … Continue reading CHAPTERS: Fuentes and Newman in Historicising Gender and Sexuality