Johnston

BOOK: Johnston on the Yarrow-Turners of Virginia-Maryland

James H. Johnston, From Slave Ship to Harvard: Yarrow Mamout and the History of an African American Family. New York, NY: Fordham University Press, 2012. Via Fordham University Press: From Slave Ship to Harvard is the true story of an African American family in Maryland over six generations. The author has reconstructed a unique narrative of black struggle and achievement from paintings, photographs, books, diaries, court … Continue reading BOOK: Johnston on the Yarrow-Turners of Virginia-Maryland

Natasha Trethewey / AP

ARTICLE: Littlefield on History, Poetry, and Natasha Trethewey’s Native Guard

Daniel C. Littlefield, “Reflections on the History Behind the Poetry of Natasha Trethewey.” Historically Speaking 14, no. 1 (2013): 15–18. Natasha Trethewey, Native Guard: Poems. First Edition. Boston: Mariner Books, 2007. First paragraph: “Rita Dove, Pulitzer-Prize winner and former Poet Laureate of the United States as well as of the Commonwealth of Virginia, introduced the nation’s newest Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey’s first published volume of … Continue reading ARTICLE: Littlefield on History, Poetry, and Natasha Trethewey’s Native Guard

Trumbull, Declaration of Independence, 1817

The President of Emory Praises 3/5ths Compromise (Context & Responses)

In the Winter 2013 issue of Emory Magazine, Emory University President James Wagner suggested the ‘3/5ths compromise’ was “a way to temper ideology and continue working toward the highest aspiration,” move beyond “polarization,” and “facilitated the achievement of what both sides of the debate really aspired to—a new nation.”

Excerpt from original column:

“…One instance of constitutional compromise was the agreement to count three-fifths of the slave population for purposes of state representation in Congress. Southern delegates wanted to count the whole slave population, which would have given the South greater influence over national policy. Northern delegates argued that slaves should not be counted at all, because they had no vote. As the price for achieving the ultimate aim of the Constitution—“to form a more perfect union”—the two sides compromised on this immediate issue of how to count slaves in the new nation. Pragmatic half-victories kept in view the higher aspiration of drawing the country more closely together…”

Continue reading “The President of Emory Praises 3/5ths Compromise (Context & Responses)”