International Underground Railroad Memorial, Detroit, MI & Windsor, Canada / Ed Dwight

FORUM on the International Underground Railroad Memorial

The January 2013 issue of the Journal of American Ethnic History hosts a forum on the International Underground Railroad Memorial: Faires, Nora. “Across the Border to Freedom: The International Underground Railroad Memorial and the Meanings of Migration.” Journal of American Ethnic History 32, no. 2 (January 1, 2013): 38–67. Kerber, Linda K. “Crossing Borders.” Journal of American Ethnic History 32, no. 2 (January 1, 2013): … Continue reading FORUM on the International Underground Railroad Memorial

African Cherokees

BOOK: Naylor on African Cherokees, Race, and Slavery

Celia E. Naylor. African Cherokees in Indian Territory: From Chattel to Citizens. Durham: The University of North Carolina Press, 2009. via University of North Carolina Press: Forcibly removed from their homes in the late 1830s, Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, and Chickasaw Indians brought their African-descended slaves with them along the Trail of Tears and resettled in Indian Territory, present-day Oklahoma. Celia E. Naylor vividly charts the … Continue reading BOOK: Naylor on African Cherokees, Race, and Slavery

Creek Paths

BOOK: Hudson on Southeastern Indian Nations in the South

Angela Pulley Hudson. Creek Paths and Federal Roads: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves and the Making of the American South. Durham: The University of North Carolina Press, 2010. via University of North Carolina Press: In Creek Paths and Federal Roads, Angela Pulley Hudson offers a new understanding of the development of the American South by examining travel within and between southeastern Indian nations and the southern … Continue reading BOOK: Hudson on Southeastern Indian Nations in the South

Originally posted on Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog:
The University of Illinois Springfield will explore the importance of the Emancipation Proclamation in a new massive open online course (MOOC) during the spring semester. The free eight-week online course is open to anyone who wants to join world-wide. The MOOC – titled The Emancipation Proclamation:  What Came Before, How It Worked, and What Followed – uses the… Continue reading

Joining Places

BOOK: Kaye on Slave Neighborhoods and Social Space

Anthony E. Kaye. Joining Places: Slave Neighborhoods in the Old South. Durham: The University of North Carolina Press, 2009. via University of North Carolina Press: In this new interpretation of antebellum slavery, Anthony Kaye offers a vivid portrait of slaves transforming adjoining plantations into slave neighborhoods. He describes men and women opening paths from their owners’ plantations to adjacent farms to go courting and take … Continue reading BOOK: Kaye on Slave Neighborhoods and Social Space

Schooling the Freed People

BOOK: Butchart on Freed People and Education in the U.S. South

Ronald Butchart. Schooling the Freed People: Teaching, Learning, and the Struggle for Black Freedom, 1861-1876. Durham: The University of North Carolina Press, 2010. via University of North Carolina Press: Conventional wisdom holds that freedmen’s education was largely the work of privileged, single white northern women motivated by evangelical beliefs and abolitionism. Backed by pathbreaking research, Ronald E. Butchart’s Schooling the Freed People shatters this notion. … Continue reading BOOK: Butchart on Freed People and Education in the U.S. South

Voices of the Enslaved

BOOK: Rodriguez on the Voices of the Enslaved in Cuba

Gloria Garcia Rodriguez. Voices of the Enslaved in Nineteenth-Century Cuba: A Documentary History. Translated by Nancy L. Westrate. Durham: The University of North Carolina Press, 2011. via University of North Carolina Press: Putting the voices of the enslaved front and center, Gloria García Rodríguez’s study presents a compelling overview of African slavery in Cuba and its relationship to the plantation system that was the economic … Continue reading BOOK: Rodriguez on the Voices of the Enslaved in Cuba

Je renais de mes cendres (via The Public Archive)

ARTICLE/JOURNAL: Radical History Review Special Issue: Haitian Lives/Global Perspectives

The Winter 2013 Radical History Review is a special issue: “Haitian Lives/Global Perspectives.” From the introduction: As several of the essays in this issue explain, in the years since Michel-Rolph Trouillot famously showed that the Haitian Revolution was “unthinkable” and its his- tory relegated to silence, the country’s history has gone from “hidden” and “unknow- able” to widely studied in the United States and beyond.2 … Continue reading ARTICLE/JOURNAL: Radical History Review Special Issue: Haitian Lives/Global Perspectives

Radical Black Reading/Reading Haiti, 2012 | The Public Archive

Easily the most hyped Haiti-related book to come out in the past year was Purpose: An Immigrant Story (It Books), the memoir of rapper-turned-presidential-candidate Wyclef Jean. They say Purpose is actually not that bad, especially if you’re interested in either Clef’s take on the dissolution of the Fugees or his embittered account of his agonized history with Lauryn Hill. But it offers little on his … Continue reading Radical Black Reading/Reading Haiti, 2012 | The Public Archive

ESSAY: Shaffer on Emancipation and “What Mattered More?”

As 1862 drew to a close, as far as emancipation was concerned the nation’s attention was riveted on whether President Abraham Lincoln would finalize the Emancipation Proclamation. They had little to worry about on that score. In the last days of 1862, Lincoln and his cabinet were not debating whether the administration should go ahead with the proclamation, but fussed over its exact wording. While … Continue reading ESSAY: Shaffer on Emancipation and “What Mattered More?”