McIntosh on Yoruba Women and Work

Marjorie Keniston McIntosh.  Yoruba Women, Work, and Social Change. Bloomington  Indiana University Press, 2009 The Yoruba, one of the largest and most historically important ethnic groups in Nigeria, are noted for the economic activity, confidence, and authority of their women. Yoruba Women, Work, and Social Change traces the history of women in Yorubaland from around 1820 to 1960 and Nigerian independence. Integrating fresh material from … Continue reading McIntosh on Yoruba Women and Work

Blight: What gives the Confederacy its staying power?

In April, when Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell issued a proclamation reviving Confederate History Month in the commonwealth, he reminded us once again of the Confederacy’s staying power. Wittingly or not, McDonnell demonstrated that historical “memory disputes” are always about the present, as he spoke in the tradition of a long line of Southern leaders beginning with the founders of the Confederacy itself. Immediately, Civil War … Continue reading Blight: What gives the Confederacy its staying power?

Rawick on Revolt, Labor

Rawick, George. Listening to Revolt: The Selected Writings of George Rawick. Charles H. Kerr, 2010. Just published by Charles H. Kerr, Listening to Revolt: Selected Writings offers the first major collection of the wide-ranging and revolutionary writings of the late George Rawick, a leading figure in both radical history and Marxist sociology. Rawick was a rarity who influenced many with his contributions to African American … Continue reading Rawick on Revolt, Labor

Kriz on Slavery & Visual Culture in British Caribbean

Kay Dian Kriz.  Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement: Picturing the British West Indies, 1700-1840.  Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art. New Haven  Yale University Press, 2008. This highly original book asks new questions about paintings and prints associated with the British West Indies between 1700 and 1840, when the trade in sugar and slaves was most active and profitable. In a … Continue reading Kriz on Slavery & Visual Culture in British Caribbean

Queloides/Keloids: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art

Curated by Alejandro de la Fuente and Elio Rodríguez Valdés Queloides/Keloids “is an art exhibit that seeks to contribute to current debates about the persistence of racism in contemporary Cuba and elsewhere in the world.”  Twelve artists are participating as the project moves from Havana, Cuba to Pittsburgh over the course of 2010-2011 including Pedro Alvarez, Maria Magdalena Campos Pons and Rene Peña. For more … Continue reading Queloides/Keloids: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art

Mitchell: Portrait or Postcard? The Controversy over a “Rare” Photograph of Slave Children

For those of us who work with historical photographs (particularly images from the nineteenth century, when the medium was still in its infancy) there are few things more thrilling than stumbling on an image we didn’t know existed. But finding and then identifying historical photographs with any certainty, particularly the subjects in them, is tricky business. Retrieving the story behind the image—who took it, of … Continue reading Mitchell: Portrait or Postcard? The Controversy over a “Rare” Photograph of Slave Children

Fryd and Joy on Slavery, Race in United States

Volume 10 (July 2010) of the Common-Place has two features on slavery and race in the United States: Vivien Green Fryd Lifting the veil of race at the U.S. Capitol Thomas Crawford’s Statue of Freedom Natalie Joy Cherokee Slaveholders and Radical Abolitionists An unlikely alliance in antebellum America Read in full at The Common-Place Continue reading Fryd and Joy on Slavery, Race in United States

Conservator Helps Salvage Haiti’s Cultural Material

“ANNAPOLIS, Md. AP — It is slow, deliberate, frustrating, yet fulfilling work trying to preserve a peoples culture.Vicki Lee, senior conservator at the Maryland State Archives in Annapolis, already has made two trips with teams of experts trying to mend Haitis cultural heritage following the devastating January earthquake, and is itching to return. “It’s so sad,” she said in an interview at her office off Rowe … Continue reading Conservator Helps Salvage Haiti’s Cultural Material

Stanley on Slave Marriage

Stanley, Amy Dru. “Instead of Waiting for the Thirteenth Amendment: The War Power, Slave Marriage, and Inviolate Human Rights.” American Historical Review 115 (June 2010): 732-765. Partial Paragraph Steal: “One decree became the Thirteenth Amendment; all but forgotten is the other, a congressional act to “encourage Enlistments” in the Union Army. The amendment provided for abolishing slavery everywhere in the United States and its territories. … Continue reading Stanley on Slave Marriage

Ted Fellow Cesar Harada Blogs 1811 Louisiana Slave Revolt, Gulf Coast Oil Spill, Environment

In 1811 white landlords were forcing black slaves to manipulate fatal toxic, such as the one required in the fabrication of Indigo (pigment). Today, the swamps owned by the former slaves children has been bought by major energy companies at an unfair price to host multi-millions polluting facilities. The descents of the slaves still live on the “fence lines” of these industries. The inhabitants suffer severe … Continue reading Ted Fellow Cesar Harada Blogs 1811 Louisiana Slave Revolt, Gulf Coast Oil Spill, Environment