Slaves in Utah alongside Brigham Young

“Listed on the Brigham Young Monument on Temple Square are the members of the first pioneer company to enter the Salt Lake Valley in July 1847. Three of the names are set just a little apart from the others under the subhead: Colored Servants. These are Green Flake, Oscar Crosby and Hark Lay. Crosby and Lay accompanied their Mormon masters to California to establish a … Continue reading Slaves in Utah alongside Brigham Young

Early Black History in Michigan Territory

Shawna Mazur writes: “Repeatedly throughout history, African Americans have played a role in shaping our country’s development. The years previous to and during the War of 1812 were no exception. Slavery was increasingly becoming an issue for the United States and Canadian governments. The differences between the two country’s policies often meant the difference between bondage and freedom. Yet, due to policy changes and confusing … Continue reading Early Black History in Michigan Territory

Boston Globe Reviews Berlin’s The Making of African America

“After the death of John Hope Franklin last year, tributes to the distinguished historian cascaded down. A major newspaper in North Carolina declared that Franklin, who retired from Duke University, “gave definition to the African-American experience.” That was a slight exaggeration, overlooking as it did predecessors such as Carter G. Woodson, creator of what has become Black History Month, but the statement was not off … Continue reading Boston Globe Reviews Berlin’s The Making of African America

Vaughan on Slavery in Mauritius

Vaughan, Megan. Creating the Creole Island: Slavery in Eighteenth-Century Mauritius. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2005. Overview: “The island of Mauritius lies in the middle of the Indian Ocean, about 550 miles east of Madagascar. Uninhabited until the arrival of colonists in the late sixteenth century, Mauritius was subsequently populated by many different peoples as successive waves of colonizers and slaves arrived at its shores. … Continue reading Vaughan on Slavery in Mauritius

CFP: States of Freedom: Freedom of States

CFP: States of Freedom: Freedom of States cross-post from H-Net Duke University and University of the West Indies-Mona Symposium June 17 and 18, 2010, Kingston, Jamaica. How are notions of freedom and governance practiced and contested within and across national spaces in the Caribbean postcolonial? This symposium explores questions of freedom and governance generated from the heart of creolization; a process that forged a uniquely … Continue reading CFP: States of Freedom: Freedom of States

CFP: Centering Families in Atlantic Worlds, 1500-1800

Centering Families in Atlantic Worlds, 1500–1800 Call for Papers A conference co-sponsored by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the Institute for Historical Studies, University of Texas, Austin. February 27–March 1, 2011, University of Texas at Austin. “For people in Europe, Africa, and the Americas, families mattered. Families functioned as key political, economic, social, cultural, and religious units, whether or not … Continue reading CFP: Centering Families in Atlantic Worlds, 1500-1800

Green on African Mexicans in Spanish Slave Societies

Green, Debra D. “African Mexicans in Spanish Slave Societies in America.” Journal of Black Studies 40 (2010): 683-699. Abstract: “This article examines the sources of the discourse on African Mexicans, often referred to as Afromexicans, in an effort to structure a more extensive foundation for cultural work. Taking an Afrocentric approach to the study of Africans who were enslaved by the Spanish in Mexico, the … Continue reading Green on African Mexicans in Spanish Slave Societies

Echeruo on Blyden, “The Jewish Question”

Echeruo, Michael J. C. “Edward W. Blyden, “The Jewish Question,” and the Diaspora: Theory and Practice.” Journal of Black Studies 40, no. 4 (March 1, 2010): 544-565. http://jbs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/40/4/544. Abstract: “Dr. Blyden’s booklet, “The Jewish Question,” has been largely ignored, as it relates not only to the Jewish Question, proper, but also to the question of African American identifications with Africa and the quest to return, … Continue reading Echeruo on Blyden, “The Jewish Question”

US Renames Mountain after Freedman John Ballard, a Blacksmith, Pioneer

“A California peak formerly known as Negrohead Mountain has been officially renamed in honour of the black pioneer who settled there in 1869. The 619-metre peak near Malibu, became Ballard Mountain after John Ballard, a blacksmith and former slave. Dozens of Ballard’s relatives attended the renaming ceremony on Saturday. The name originally contained an even more offensive racial slur which appeared on federal maps, but … Continue reading US Renames Mountain after Freedman John Ballard, a Blacksmith, Pioneer

“Fireburn” National Holiday Proposed in St. Croix

“ST. CROIX – A bill that would add a holiday commemorating the 1878 Fireburn to the list of government holidays will go before the full Senate for consideration, after the Rules and Judiciary Committee gave the measure a nod on Tuesday. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Terrence Nelson, notes the significance of the 1878 laborers’ revolt to the people of the Virgin Islands and adds … Continue reading “Fireburn” National Holiday Proposed in St. Croix