Blackburn on Haiti, Slavery and the Age of Democratic Revolution

Blackburn, Robin. “Haiti, Slavery, and the Age of the Democratic Revolution.” William & Mary Quarterly 63 (October 2006): 643-674. First paragraph steal: “IN the sequence of revolutions that remade the Atlantic world from 1776 to 1825, the Haitian Revolution is rarely given its due, yet without it there is much that cannot be accounted for. The revolutions—American, French, Haitian, and Spanish-American—should be seen as interconnected, … Continue reading Blackburn on Haiti, Slavery and the Age of Democratic Revolution

“State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations” Considering Name Change

“A push to drop “Providence Plantations” from that name advanced farther than ever on Thursday when House lawmakers voted 70-3 to let residents decide whether their home should simply be called the “State of Rhode Island.” It’s an encouraging sign for those who believe the formal name conjures up images of slavery, while opponents argue it’s an unnecessary rewriting of history that ignores Rhode Island’s … Continue reading “State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations” Considering Name Change

Rothschild and Freshfields Link to Slavery

From the article: “Documents from Britain’s national archives showed that Nathan Mayer Rothschild had allowed the use of slaves as collateral in banking dealings with a slave owner, while Freshfields’ founding partner James William Freshfield acted as a trustee in deals involving Caribbean slave plantations, the FT reported. Freshfields said it had not been aware of the documents, which academics at University College London are … Continue reading Rothschild and Freshfields Link to Slavery

Who Reads an Early American Book?

In a special issue of the Common Place, historians weigh in on the early American books that inspire them as teachers and researchers: The nine historians featured here treat literature as evidence, but they do not see the books they recommend as repositories of neutral “facts.” Carolyn Eastman considers the readers of a frequently reprinted “true account” of Caribbean pirates. Vincent Brown discovers a new … Continue reading Who Reads an Early American Book?

Reading Leonora Sansay’s Horrors of Santo Domingo

Via The Displacement of the American Novel: Strangely, former defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld and Slovenian intellectual Slavoj Žižek can help contemporary readers understand the significance of Leonora Sansay’s fascinating and only recently rediscovered novel of Caribbean intrigue, Secret History; or The Horrors of St. Domingo (1808). Defending the Iraq War, Rumsfeld classified the threats posed by Iraq’s weapons: 1) known knowns, or what we know … Continue reading Reading Leonora Sansay’s Horrors of Santo Domingo

O’Malley on Slave Migration in the Caribbean and North America

O’Malley, Gregory E. “Beyond the Middle Passage: Slave Migration from the Caribbean to North America, 1619–1807.” The William and Mary Quarterly 66, no. 1 (January 2009). http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/wm/66.1/omalley.html. First paragraph steal: “On April 18, 1752, 160 Africans first glimpsed the New World, sailing into Bridgetown, Barbados, aboard the Liverpool ship Africa, captained by Thomas Hinde. Uncertain of their fate, the captives perhaps took comfort in sighting … Continue reading O’Malley on Slave Migration in the Caribbean and North America

Black American Feminisms Bibliography

Compiled by Sherri L. Barnes and hosted by University of California at Santa Barbara Libraries From the Introduction: Welcome to Black American Feminisms: A Multidisciplinary Bibliography, an extensive bibliography of black American Feminist thought from across the disciplines. References date back to the nineteenth century when African American women like Maria Stewart, Anna Julia Cooper and Sojourner Truth challenged the conventions and mores of their … Continue reading Black American Feminisms Bibliography

Girard on Louverture the “International Statesman”

Girard, Philippe R. “Black Talleyrand: Toussaint Louverture’s Diplomacy, 1798–1802.” The William and Mary Quarterly 66, no. 1 (January 2009). http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/wm/66.1/girard.html.  First paragraph steal: “Louverture’s record as an international statesman remains largely occluded, though he served as quasi-independent ruler of Saint Domingue for nearly four years (November 1798–February 1802). Atlantic historians studying the Haitian Revolution remain focused on the racial and social dimensions of the slave … Continue reading Girard on Louverture the “International Statesman”

U.S. Senate Apologizes for Slavery

On Thursday, June 18, 2009, the United States Senate passed a non-binding resolution apologizing to African-Americans for the wrongs of slavery.   The resolution did not offer reparations. via Faculty Lounge: This follows on the heels of the Brown University’s Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice, which issued its report in 2006, as well as several state apologies for slavery in 2007.  I’ve already expressed surprise … Continue reading U.S. Senate Apologizes for Slavery

Wilson on Performance, Freedom and Maroons

Wilson, Kathleen. “The Performance of Freedom: Maroons and the Colonial Order in Eighteenth-Century Jamaica and the Atlantic Sound.” The William and Mary Quarterly 66, no. 1 (January 2009). http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/wm/66.1/wilson.html.  First paragraph steal: “In 1764 Edward Long witnessed an extraordinary performance. It exuded all the drama and flair of any production at Drury Lane or Covent Garden, yet it took place in Montego Bay, near the … Continue reading Wilson on Performance, Freedom and Maroons