Africa, Africans, and Slavery in Latin America

The November 2007 issue of the Hispanic American Historical Review features three articles on Africans, slavery and conceptions of Africa in three Latin American countries: Buenos Aires, Cuba, and Uruguay. This issue (87:4) was the last issue published while the journal was headquartered at the University of Maryland-College Park, an institution well known for pioneering the study of slavery and emancipation in the United States … Continue reading Africa, Africans, and Slavery in Latin America

New Podcast: Africa Past & Present

The Africa Past & Present podcast is hosted by Michigan State University historians Peter Alegi and Peter Limb and is produced by MATRIX – The Center for Humane Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences Online at MSU. Listen and subscribe to the fortnightly “Africa Past and Present” podcast at: http://afripod.aodl.org/ A new episode of Africa Past & Present – the podcast about history, culture, and politics … Continue reading New Podcast: Africa Past & Present

Guardians of the Slave Trade

Stephanie E. Smallwood, “African Guardians, European Slave Ships, and the Changing Dynamics of Power in the Early Modern Atlantic,” William & Mary Quarterly 64, no. 4 (October 2007): 679-716. First Paragraph Steal: “POWER was nowhere more precariously held in the early modern Atlantic than aboard a slave ship. Because their cargoes were unwilling travelers, slave ships were distinguished by the unmitigated contest between African captives … Continue reading Guardians of the Slave Trade

Women of Color and Slavery in the United States

In the summer of 2007, the Journal of Women’s History (19:2) published a roundtable on “The History of Women and Slavery: Considering the Impact of Ar’n’t I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South on the Twentieth Anniversary of Its Publication.” According to the “Introduction” by Jennifer L. Morgan, the roundtable was originally a series of papers presented in June 2005 at the 13th … Continue reading Women of Color and Slavery in the United States

Debating Olaudah Equiano

Vincent Carretta and Paul Lovejoy debate Olaudah Equiano’s origins in the December 2006 and April 2007 issues of Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post Slave Studies. The debate surrounds Vincent Carretta’s argument that there is convincing evidence that Equiano was not an African, as he claimed, but was born as a slave in South Carolina. In his biography of Equiano, Equiano, the … Continue reading Debating Olaudah Equiano

Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database Online

From the website: Over 34,000 individual slaving expeditions between 1527 and 1866 that have been identified and verified to have actually occurred make up the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database. Records of the voyages have been found in multiple archival sources which are listed in a variable in the dataset. These records provide details about vessels, enslaved peoples, slave traders and owners, and trading routes. The … Continue reading Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database Online

Bernie D. Jones on Southern Free Women of Color Legal History

Bernie D. Jones, “Southern Free Women of Color in the Antebellum North: Race, Class, and a ‘New Women’s Legal History” in Akron Law Review (forthcoming) Abstract: This article explores the possibilities of a “new women’s legal history” as indicated by the intersections of race, gender and class as experienced by Southern enslaved women newly freed in the antebellum North, such as Nancy Wells of Mississippi … Continue reading Bernie D. Jones on Southern Free Women of Color Legal History

Eltis, Morgan and Richardson on the African Contribution to Rice Cultivation in the Americas

David Eltis, Philip D. Morgan, and David Richardson, “Agency and Diaspora in Atlantic History: Reassessing the African Contribution to Rice Cultivation in the Americas,” American Historical Review 112, no. 5 (December 2007): 1329-1358. First Paragraph Steal: Broadly speaking, two contrasting models dominate interpretations of Atlantic history. One draws on Old World influences to explain the nature of societies and cultures in the Americas, while the … Continue reading Eltis, Morgan and Richardson on the African Contribution to Rice Cultivation in the Americas

Gene Nichol’s Email to Faculty and Staff at the College of William and Mary upon his Dismissal as President

Dear Members of the William & Mary Community:I was informed by the Rector on Sunday, after our Charter Day celebrations, that my contract will not be renewed in July. Appropriately, serving the College in the wake of such a decision is beyond my imagining. Accordingly, I have advised the Rector, and announce today, effective immediately, my resignation as president of the College of William & … Continue reading Gene Nichol’s Email to Faculty and Staff at the College of William and Mary upon his Dismissal as President