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BOOK: Lightfoot on Slavery and Freedom in Antigua

Natasha Lightfoot, Troubling Freedom: Antigua and the Aftermath of British Emancipation. Durham: Duke University Press Books, 2015. via Duke University Press: “In 1834 Antigua became the only British colony in the Caribbean to move directly from slavery to full emancipation. Immediate freedom, however, did not live up to its promise, as it did not guarantee any level of stability or autonomy, and the implementation of … Continue reading BOOK: Lightfoot on Slavery and Freedom in Antigua

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Shepherd Interview on the Morant Bay Rebellion in The Voice

Verene Shepherd, professor of social history at the University of the West Indies, reflects on the 150th anniversary of Morant Bay and the execution of Paul Bogle… What was, in your view, the main trigger for the rebellion? VS: First of all, it was a war, not a rebellion. Both sides were armed and the word “war” has been enshrined in the oral history of … Continue reading Shepherd Interview on the Morant Bay Rebellion in The Voice

Bonner on Frederick Douglass’s Compressed, Expanding World | @AAIHS

Christopher Bonner writes: “As Douglass saw it, technological development enhanced political work. Steamships brought news from Europe in as few as fifteen days, which struck him as an immediate kind of knowledge that allowed a localized movement to exert a broad and seemingly instant influence. “A revolution now cannot be confined to the place or the people where it may commence, but flashes with lightning … Continue reading Bonner on Frederick Douglass’s Compressed, Expanding World | @AAIHS

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Johnson on Black Death and the Gallows in 18th Century Jamaica

“One evening, on a road in Jamaica, a soldier belonging to the “Mulatto Company” made his evening rounds. He came upon a black man in the woods. The soldier called for his attention. Receiving no answer, he killed him…” Jessica Marie Johnson’s October post for the African American Intellectual Society Blog is on black death and this rare sketch (available at the Library Company of … Continue reading Johnson on Black Death and the Gallows in 18th Century Jamaica

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EDITED: Frederickson and Walters on Slavery, Gender, and Resistance

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Frederickson, Mary E., and Delores M. Walters, eds. Gendered Resistance: Women, Slavery, and the Legacy of Margaret Garner. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2013.

Via University of Illinois Press:

Continue reading “EDITED: Frederickson and Walters on Slavery, Gender, and Resistance”

Ferrer Interviewed by the Public Archive

The Public Archive recently interviewed Ada Ferrer about her latest book, Freedom’s Mirror: Cuba and Haiti in the Age of Revolution (2014): FERRER: “Among slaves and people of color you see something equivalent. Many scholars have argued that the Haitian Revolution –to quote Eugene Genovese—“propelled a revolution in consciousness” among African Americans. I agree, but again it was one based on material contact and knowledge. … Continue reading Ferrer Interviewed by the Public Archive

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AUDIO: Kelley on Michael Brown And Dred Scott | Here & Now

Demonstrators display signs during a protest on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Missouri on August 18, 2014. Police fired tear gas in another night of unrest in a Missouri town where a white police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, just hours after President Barack Obama called for calm. AFP PHOTO / Michael B. Thomas        (Photo credit should read Michael B. Thomas/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators display signs during a protest on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Missouri on August 18, 2014. Police fired tear gas in another night of unrest in a Missouri town where a white police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, just hours after President Barack Obama called for calm. AFP PHOTO / Michael B. Thomas (Photo credit should read Michael B. Thomas/AFP/Getty Images)

 

via Here & Now:

There have been violent protests against the police in Ferguson, Missouri, for more than a week, since police shot and killed an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown.

An African-American professor watching the situation sees a link between what’s happening in Missouri today and what happened in the state in the 1800s when it was at the center of the national debate and divide over slavery.

Blair Kelley, who teaches history at North Carolina State University, finds parallels between Michael Brown and Dred Scott, a slave who sued for his freedom and ultimately lost his case in the U.S. Supreme Court in 1857.

Continue reading “AUDIO: Kelley on Michael Brown And Dred Scott | Here & Now”