Ambiguous Anniversary

EDITED: Gleeson and Lewis on the Bicentennial of the International Slave Trade Bans

David T. Gleeson and Simon Lewis, eds. Ambiguous Anniversary: The Bicentennial of the International Slave Trade Bans. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2012. From University of South Carolina Press: In March 1807, within a few weeks of each other, both the United States and the United Kingdom passed laws banning the international slave trade. Two hundred years later, Great Britain, an instigator of the slave … Continue reading EDITED: Gleeson and Lewis on the Bicentennial of the International Slave Trade Bans

Caryl Phillips / Source: Center for Creative Arts

INTERVIEW: Rice x Caryl Phillips on African Atlantic Memory

Alan Rice. “A Home for Ourselves in the World: Caryl Phillips on Slave Forts and Manillas as African Atlantic Sites of Memory.” Atlantic Studies 9, no. 3 (2012): 363–372. Abstract “This interview with the black Atlantic writer Caryl Phillips focuses on his non-fiction works and interrogates his ideas on the African diaspora and memorialisation, paying particular attention to such locales as African slave forts and … Continue reading INTERVIEW: Rice x Caryl Phillips on African Atlantic Memory

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REVIEW: Johnson on STN’s 18th Century French Book Trade Database

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“Europeans Purchasing a Slave Woman, late 18th cent.,” Guillaume Raynal, Histoire Philosophique et Politique . . . des Europeens dans les Deux Indes (Geneva, 1780), vol. 7, p. 377. (Copy at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University) Image Reference H005 as shown on http://www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.

From The French Book Trade in Enlightenment Europe website:

The French Book Trade in Enlightenment Europe project uses database technology to map the trade of the Société Typographique de Neuchâtel (STN), a celebrated Swiss publishing house that operated between 1769 and 1794.

As the STN sold the works of other publishers alongside its own editions, their archives can be considered a representative source for studying the history of the book trade and dissemination of ideas in the late Enlightenment.

Using state of the art database, web interface and GIS technology, the project provides a user-friendly resource for use by scholars, teachers and students of French literature and history, book history, the Enlightenment and bibliography more generally…

Continue reading “REVIEW: Johnson on STN’s 18th Century French Book Trade Database”

BOOK:  Tillet on Slavery, Citizenship, and Racial Democracy

BOOK: Tillet on Slavery, Citizenship, and Racial Democracy

Salamisha Tillet. Sites of Slavery:  Citizenship and Racial Democracy in the Post-Civil Rights Imagination. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2012. via Duke University Press: “More than forty years after the major victories of the civil rights movement, African Americans have a vexed relation to the civic myth of the United States as the land of equal opportunity and justice for all. In Sites of Slavery … Continue reading BOOK: Tillet on Slavery, Citizenship, and Racial Democracy

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BOOK: Araujo on the Public Memory of Slavery

If recent scholarship has focused on the memory of slavery in the United States, few works have dealt with the public memory of slavery from a transnational perspective. When examining the role of the African Diaspora in the reconstructions of the slave past, most authors have limited their analysis to the African American community and have overlooked the importance of the South Atlantic region, in … Continue reading BOOK: Araujo on the Public Memory of Slavery

Journey Stories Exhibit: “To Freedom: Tracing the Journeys of Enslaved African Americans”

Discussions about slavery continue to stir emotions. This exhibition examines the journeys experienced by enslaved Africans brought to the United States. From the journey into bondage, travels while enslaved, and escaping to freedom, voyages — forced and voluntary — shaped the way slavery evolved and, ultimately, ended in America. via Journey Stories | Browse Exhibits. Profhacker has a post on Omeka, the free and open-source … Continue reading Journey Stories Exhibit: “To Freedom: Tracing the Journeys of Enslaved African Americans”

WEB: Levy on Failure of the Freedman’s Bank and the Gilded Age (LOC Webcast)

ACLS Mellon Fellow Jonathan Levy discusses the failure of the Freedman Savings and Trust Company at the Library of Congress: In 1865, Congress chartered the non-profit “Freedman’s Savings and Trust Company,” a savings bank designed for a population of four million newly emancipated American slaves. By 1873, it had received a staggering $50,000,000 in deposits. But the banking house Jay Cooke & Co. was charged … Continue reading WEB: Levy on Failure of the Freedman’s Bank and the Gilded Age (LOC Webcast)

Mitchell: Portrait or Postcard? The Controversy over a “Rare” Photograph of Slave Children

For those of us who work with historical photographs (particularly images from the nineteenth century, when the medium was still in its infancy) there are few things more thrilling than stumbling on an image we didn’t know existed. But finding and then identifying historical photographs with any certainty, particularly the subjects in them, is tricky business. Retrieving the story behind the image—who took it, of … Continue reading Mitchell: Portrait or Postcard? The Controversy over a “Rare” Photograph of Slave Children

Conservator Helps Salvage Haiti’s Cultural Material

“ANNAPOLIS, Md. AP — It is slow, deliberate, frustrating, yet fulfilling work trying to preserve a peoples culture.Vicki Lee, senior conservator at the Maryland State Archives in Annapolis, already has made two trips with teams of experts trying to mend Haitis cultural heritage following the devastating January earthquake, and is itching to return. “It’s so sad,” she said in an interview at her office off Rowe … Continue reading Conservator Helps Salvage Haiti’s Cultural Material

McGill Tours Slave Cabins to Preserve History – TheSunNews.com

“Joseph McGill spent Saturday night in a place where slaves slept – in a cabin at Hobcaw Barony in Georgetown. As a preservationist, his intent is to bring attention to the endangered structures. “African-Americans have lost a lot of the buildings that can help interpret their stories,” McGill said. “This is a great place to start in helping to save those buildings.” He also plans … Continue reading McGill Tours Slave Cabins to Preserve History – TheSunNews.com