Adam Rothman

Rothman Remarks on Marguerite Thompson’s Petition for Freedom

Adam Rothman remarks on a freed woman of color’s petition for manumission, posted by the National Archives on June 30, 2015: “…One aspect of Marguerite Thompson’s petition that drew my attention is the fact that she submitted her petition to the Judge Charles Peabody’s U.S. Provisional Court (USPC). This court was established by the United … Continue reading

BOOK: Frankel on Freedom’s Women in Mississippi
Noralee Frankel

BOOK: Frankel on Freedom’s Women in Mississippi

Noralee Frankel, Freedom’s Women: Black Women and Families in Civil War Era Mississippi. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999. via Indiana U Press: “Freedom’s Women examines African American women’s experiences during the Civil War and early Reconstruction years in Mississippi. Exploring issues of family and work, the author shows how African American women’s attempts to achieve … Continue reading

Ferrer Interviewed by the Public Archive
Ada Ferrer

Ferrer Interviewed by the Public Archive

The Public Archive recently interviewed Ada Ferrer about her latest book, Freedom’s Mirror: Cuba and Haiti in the Age of Revolution (2014): FERRER: “Among slaves and people of color you see something equivalent. Many scholars have argued that the Haitian Revolution –to quote Eugene Genovese—“propelled a revolution in consciousness” among African Americans. I agree, but … Continue reading

BOOK: Hunter on Southern Black Women After the Civil War
Tera Hunter

BOOK: Hunter on Southern Black Women After the Civil War

Tera W. Hunter, To “Joy My Freedom:” Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors after the Civil War. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998. via Harvard University Press: “As the Civil War drew to a close, newly emancipated black women workers made their way to Atlanta—the economic hub of the newly emerging urban and industrial south—in … Continue reading

Christopher Bonner

Bonner on Black Politics in a New World

Over at the African American Intellectual History Society Blog, Christopher Bonner discusses free black activism (and extralegal violence against them) in the United States after the Civil War: “Perhaps Henry Highland Garnet was accustomed to having his life threatened. In early August 1865, the black activist and orator, who had spent most of his life … Continue reading

ARTICLE: Cardyn on Sexualized Racism/Gendered KKK Violence
Lisa Cardyn

ARTICLE: Cardyn on Sexualized Racism/Gendered KKK Violence

  Lisa Cardyn, “Sexualized Racism/Gendered Violence: Outraging the Body Politic in the Reconstruction South.” Michigan Law Review 100, no. 4 (February 2002): 675. doi:10.2307/1290425. “This Article examines the calculated deployment of sexualized violence by the Reconstruction-era klans and its relationship to competing notions of justice, citizenship, and sexual propriety. Exploring what is distinctly sexual about … Continue reading

Foner on the Underground Railroad (NYTimes.com)
Eric Foner

Foner on the Underground Railroad (NYTimes.com)

Eric Foner on revisiting histories of the Underground Railroad: “That view largely held among scholars until 1961, when the historian Larry Gara published “The Liberty Line,” a slashing revisionist study that dismissed the Underground Railroad as a myth and argued that most fugitive slaves escaped at their own initiative, with little help from organized abolitionists. … Continue reading

Mekala Audain

VIDEO: Audain on US Fugitive Slaves Mexico

Mekala Audain (Postdoctoral Fellow in History at Brown University) discusses her research following slaves who escaped from Louisiana to Spanish Texas in the early nineteenth century: “Typically, when people think about the Underground Railroad, they think about slaves in the South escaping into the North. But as slavery expanded further south and eventually westward, the … Continue reading