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BOOK: Lightfoot on Slavery and Freedom in Antigua

Natasha Lightfoot, Troubling Freedom: Antigua and the Aftermath of British Emancipation. Durham: Duke University Press Books, 2015. via Duke University Press: “In 1834 Antigua became the only British colony in the Caribbean to move directly from slavery to full emancipation. Immediate freedom, however, did not live up to its promise, as it did not guarantee any level of stability or autonomy, and the implementation of … Continue reading BOOK: Lightfoot on Slavery and Freedom in Antigua

Bonner on Frederick Douglass’s Compressed, Expanding World | @AAIHS

Christopher Bonner writes: “As Douglass saw it, technological development enhanced political work. Steamships brought news from Europe in as few as fifteen days, which struck him as an immediate kind of knowledge that allowed a localized movement to exert a broad and seemingly instant influence. “A revolution now cannot be confined to the place or the people where it may commence, but flashes with lightning … Continue reading Bonner on Frederick Douglass’s Compressed, Expanding World | @AAIHS

Rothman Remarks on Marguerite Thompson’s Petition for Freedom

Adam Rothman remarks on a freed woman of color’s petition for manumission, posted by the National Archives on June 30, 2015: “…One aspect of Marguerite Thompson’s petition that drew my attention is the fact that she submitted her petition to the Judge Charles Peabody’s U.S. Provisional Court (USPC). This court was established by the United States after Union forces seized New Orleans in 1862. Legal … Continue reading Rothman Remarks on Marguerite Thompson’s Petition for Freedom

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BOOK: Frankel on Freedom’s Women in Mississippi

Noralee Frankel, Freedom’s Women: Black Women and Families in Civil War Era Mississippi. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999. via Indiana U Press: “Freedom’s Women examines African American women’s experiences during the Civil War and early Reconstruction years in Mississippi. Exploring issues of family and work, the author shows how African American women’s attempts to achieve more control over their lives shaped their attitudes toward work, … Continue reading BOOK: Frankel on Freedom’s Women in Mississippi

Ferrer Interviewed by the Public Archive

The Public Archive recently interviewed Ada Ferrer about her latest book, Freedom’s Mirror: Cuba and Haiti in the Age of Revolution (2014): FERRER: “Among slaves and people of color you see something equivalent. Many scholars have argued that the Haitian Revolution –to quote Eugene Genovese—“propelled a revolution in consciousness” among African Americans. I agree, but again it was one based on material contact and knowledge. … Continue reading Ferrer Interviewed by the Public Archive

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BOOK: Hunter on Southern Black Women After the Civil War

Tera W. Hunter, To “Joy My Freedom:” Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors after the Civil War. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998. via Harvard University Press: “As the Civil War drew to a close, newly emancipated black women workers made their way to Atlanta—the economic hub of the newly emerging urban and industrial south—in order to build an independent and free life on the … Continue reading BOOK: Hunter on Southern Black Women After the Civil War

Bonner on Black Politics in a New World

Over at the African American Intellectual History Society Blog, Christopher Bonner discusses free black activism (and extralegal violence against them) in the United States after the Civil War: “Perhaps Henry Highland Garnet was accustomed to having his life threatened. In early August 1865, the black activist and orator, who had spent most of his life in New York, sat as an honorary delegate at a … Continue reading Bonner on Black Politics in a New World

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ARTICLE: Cardyn on Sexualized Racism/Gendered KKK Violence

  Lisa Cardyn, “Sexualized Racism/Gendered Violence: Outraging the Body Politic in the Reconstruction South.” Michigan Law Review 100, no. 4 (February 2002): 675. doi:10.2307/1290425. “This Article examines the calculated deployment of sexualized violence by the Reconstruction-era klans and its relationship to competing notions of justice, citizenship, and sexual propriety. Exploring what is distinctly sexual about klan terror–the sheer pervasiveness, intensity, and ideological coherence of these … Continue reading ARTICLE: Cardyn on Sexualized Racism/Gendered KKK Violence

Foner on the Underground Railroad (NYTimes.com)

Eric Foner on revisiting histories of the Underground Railroad: “That view largely held among scholars until 1961, when the historian Larry Gara published “The Liberty Line,” a slashing revisionist study that dismissed the Underground Railroad as a myth and argued that most fugitive slaves escaped at their own initiative, with little help from organized abolitionists. Scholarship on the topic all but dried up, as historians … Continue reading Foner on the Underground Railroad (NYTimes.com)