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DIGITAL: “Lost Friends” Database: Former Slaves Searching for Kin

Originally posted on Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog:
Two dollars in 1880 bought a yearlong subscription to the Southwestern Christian Advocate, a newspaper published in New Orleans by the Methodist Book Concern and distributed to nearly five hundred preachers, eight hundred post offices, and more than four thousand subscribers in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Arkansas. The “Lost Friends” column, which ran from the paper’s 1877… Continue reading DIGITAL: “Lost Friends” Database: Former Slaves Searching for Kin

Bree Newsome Speaks Out After Her Act of Civil Disobedience

At dawn on June 27, 2015, Bree Newsome (with support from local activists) scaled the flag pole in front of South Carolina’s courthouse in Charleston, and took down the Confederate flag. She was immediately arrested and posted bail (thanks, in part, to crowdfunded support from Color of Change and Ferguson Action). In an exclusive statement published at Blue Nation Review, Bree Newsome explained what she … Continue reading Bree Newsome Speaks Out After Her Act of Civil Disobedience

Rothman Remarks on Marguerite Thompson’s Petition for Freedom

Adam Rothman remarks on a freed woman of color’s petition for manumission, posted by the National Archives on June 30, 2015: “…One aspect of Marguerite Thompson’s petition that drew my attention is the fact that she submitted her petition to the Judge Charles Peabody’s U.S. Provisional Court (USPC). This court was established by the United States after Union forces seized New Orleans in 1862. Legal … Continue reading Rothman Remarks on Marguerite Thompson’s Petition for Freedom

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BOOK: Frankel on Freedom’s Women in Mississippi

Noralee Frankel, Freedom’s Women: Black Women and Families in Civil War Era Mississippi. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999. via Indiana U Press: “Freedom’s Women examines African American women’s experiences during the Civil War and early Reconstruction years in Mississippi. Exploring issues of family and work, the author shows how African American women’s attempts to achieve more control over their lives shaped their attitudes toward work, … Continue reading BOOK: Frankel on Freedom’s Women in Mississippi

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BOOK: Hunter on Southern Black Women After the Civil War

Tera W. Hunter, To “Joy My Freedom:” Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors after the Civil War. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998. via Harvard University Press: “As the Civil War drew to a close, newly emancipated black women workers made their way to Atlanta—the economic hub of the newly emerging urban and industrial south—in order to build an independent and free life on the … Continue reading BOOK: Hunter on Southern Black Women After the Civil War

Bonner on Black Politics in a New World

Over at the African American Intellectual History Society Blog, Christopher Bonner discusses free black activism (and extralegal violence against them) in the United States after the Civil War: “Perhaps Henry Highland Garnet was accustomed to having his life threatened. In early August 1865, the black activist and orator, who had spent most of his life in New York, sat as an honorary delegate at a … Continue reading Bonner on Black Politics in a New World

[Susie Sharpe Family]" in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill. As seen here: http://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/nc_post/id/774/rec/8

BLOG: Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina (2010)

  Johnston, Angelina Ray, and Wise, Robinson. “Commemorating Faithful Slaves, Mammies, and Black Confederates.” Blog. Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina, March 19, 2010. http://docsouth.unc.edu/commland/features/essays/ray_wise/. “…Anxious to refute any suggestion that slavery had required the dehumanization of African Americans, white Southerners recalled their enslaved caretakers as willing “servants” who had been content, even grateful, for their lot in life. These commemorative gestures, which only hinted at … Continue reading BLOG: Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina (2010)

Baptist On “What the Economist Doesn’t Get About Slavery” in POLITICO Magazine

“We think of authors as people who lay themselves bare in their books, but perhaps reviewers of books reveal their innermost fears and beliefs as well. That can be true even when—as in the distinguished British periodical the Economist, founded in 1843—the reviewers hide behind anonymity. When Mr./Ms. Anonymous of the Economist reviewed my book The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making … Continue reading Baptist On “What the Economist Doesn’t Get About Slavery” in POLITICO Magazine