BOOK: Frankel on Freedom’s Women in Mississippi
Noralee Frankel

BOOK: Frankel on Freedom’s Women in Mississippi

Noralee Frankel, Freedom’s Women: Black Women and Families in Civil War Era Mississippi. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999. via Indiana U Press: “Freedom’s Women examines African American women’s experiences during the Civil War and early Reconstruction years in Mississippi. Exploring issues of family and work, the author shows how African American women’s attempts to achieve … Continue reading

BOOK: Hunter on Southern Black Women After the Civil War
Tera Hunter

BOOK: Hunter on Southern Black Women After the Civil War

Tera W. Hunter, To “Joy My Freedom:” Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors after the Civil War. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998. via Harvard University Press: “As the Civil War drew to a close, newly emancipated black women workers made their way to Atlanta—the economic hub of the newly emerging urban and industrial south—in … Continue reading

Christopher Bonner

Bonner on Black Politics in a New World

Over at the African American Intellectual History Society Blog, Christopher Bonner discusses free black activism (and extralegal violence against them) in the United States after the Civil War: “Perhaps Henry Highland Garnet was accustomed to having his life threatened. In early August 1865, the black activist and orator, who had spent most of his life … Continue reading

BLOG: Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina (2010)
Angelina Ray Johnston / Robinson Wise

BLOG: Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina (2010)

  Johnston, Angelina Ray, and Wise, Robinson. “Commemorating Faithful Slaves, Mammies, and Black Confederates.” Blog. Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina, March 19, 2010. http://docsouth.unc.edu/commland/features/essays/ray_wise/. “…Anxious to refute any suggestion that slavery had required the dehumanization of African Americans, white Southerners recalled their enslaved caretakers as willing “servants” who had been content, even grateful, for their … Continue reading

Baptist On “What the Economist Doesn’t Get About Slavery” in POLITICO Magazine
Edward E. Baptist

Baptist On “What the Economist Doesn’t Get About Slavery” in POLITICO Magazine

“We think of authors as people who lay themselves bare in their books, but perhaps reviewers of books reveal their innermost fears and beliefs as well. That can be true even when—as in the distinguished British periodical the Economist, founded in 1843—the reviewers hide behind anonymity. When Mr./Ms. Anonymous of the Economist reviewed my book … Continue reading

DIGITAL/EXHIBIT: “I will be heard!” Abolitionism in America (Cornell U)
Katherine Reagan / Petrina Jackson

DIGITAL/EXHIBIT: “I will be heard!” Abolitionism in America (Cornell U)

From the introduction: Inspired by conscience and guided by principle, abolitionists took a moral stand against slavery that produced one of America’s greatest victories for democracy. Through decades of strife, and often at the risk of their lives, anti-slavery activists remained steadfast in the face of powerful opposition. Their efforts would ultimately force the issue … Continue reading

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WEB: Visual Culture of the American Civil War

New website: The historical record of the American Civil War includes a vast amount of visual material—photographs, illustrated news periodicals, comic publications, individually-published prints, almanacs, political cartoons, illustrated envelopes, trade cards, greeting cards, sheet music covers, money, and more. The era’s visual media heralded an unprecedented change in the production and availability of pictorial media … Continue reading